Legit Bitcoin Autosurf CryptoCoins Info Club

Investing Online with Crypto: "Clixcoin"

Clixcoin, an Advertsing Faucet in which to invest online with crypto even for those with very little financial availability.
First article of the month dedicated to advertising, now an increasingly predominant type in the sector of cryptocurrency faucet sites.
Clixcoin, this is the name of the site, already has over a year of life behind it and at the time of writing we can consider it among the reliable sites. Thanks to our article, investing online with crypto on Clixcoin will become easy with the first steps.

After logging in, you will immediately see the introductory page which in the center shows 2 main buttons: My account, which leads to the Dashboard, and Learn More which leads to the F.A.Q. page.
At the top we have a menu that will be repeated in the Dashboard and that we will then describe later. Scrolling down the classic general information is displayed: last transfers, number of subscribers, main functions, etc ...

Your Clixcoin account.
By selecting My Account, the main screen will appear consisting of a menu bar and all the details relating to your account.
The menu is divided as follows:


- Dashboard: where are you now


- Earn Bitcoin: the section that allows you to earn cryptocurrencies. Divided into 4 categories: Surf Ads, for which it will be sufficient to leave the page open until the timer expires; Active Windows Ads, with which you are forced to keep the page displayed on the screen open until the timer expires; Auto Surf Ads, with which you will earn a small amount of Satoshi by automatically letting some advertising pages scroll; Paid to Promote, where you will earn money by advertising Clixcoin using a link provided by the site. You can use it in combination with the many banners available.


- Contest: the classic competitions that in this case reward those who get the most earnings from Referrals or Paid To Promote.


- Miner: in this section you can buy a mining package by choosing from four different categories based on cost and power. You can buy as many packages as you want and each will last for 30 days. The accumulated Coins will later be convertible into Satoshi Bitcoin.

Let's explore how to invest in advertising through crypto.

- Advertisers: the section dedicated to advertising campaigns. Divided into four categories identical to those seen in Earn Bitcoin. The available options will allow you to enter title, URL, duration, description and activation after approval. Each campaign has a standard cost that will increase based on the duration of the individual advertisements. More accessible in terms of costs than other advertising sites.


- Membership: as seen in other similar sites, it is possible to increase your membership level (divided into 4 levels) upon payment of a subscription. Going up in level will increase the percentage of earnings related to their clicks and those of their subscribers as well as a percentage on their purchases in the miner section and their level upgrade.


- Referrals: all your referrals will be listed in my referrals including statistics and earnings obtained. In my referral link, your referral URL and a wide choice of banners of various sizes are provided together with the pre-compiled HTML code to be included on your sites.


- History: lists all deposits made and cryptocurrency transfers to your wallets. The minimum threshold is currently set at 40000 Satoshi.


- Settings: here you will be given the opportunity to decide whether to show your nickname during contests, to your subscribers and in transfers. You can change your password and your personal or FaucetPay Bitcoin address.


Still on the Dashboard ...
Returning to the Dashboard, let's quickly spend a few words on its content even if it is already repeated almost completely in the menu just described.
In succession we have:


- Main Balance which displays the total accumulated Satoshi. The Withdraw button will send directly to the transfers section.


- Advertising Balance, with its deposit button, which displays the amount dedicated to the advertising section.


- Referrals, shows the number of personal referrals and a button that opens a page showing all the clicks made by you and your referrals.


- PTP, same as above but concerning the Paid to Promote. A button will send you to the dedicated page.


- Offers and Games, not yet active.
- Membership, your current rank.
- Ads Surfed, the clicks made by you and your subscribers.
- Earnings, the Satoshi earned by you and your subscribers.

Finally, a graph showing your and your subscribers' clicks made in the last 7 days. As you have read, investing online with crypto in the advertising market is safe and does not require large investments.

See you soon for a new article!

If you liked this article and would like to contribute with a donation:

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By: cryptoall.it
Telegram Channel: t.me/giulo75
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submitted by Giulo75 to u/Giulo75 [link] [comments]

How I earn effortless passive income and how you can do, too! (includes refs)

Hey guys,

I'm a twenty-something student from Germany starting his journey to generate passive income and I would like to share my plan with you and maybe inspire you. I really start from scratch and being a STEM-related student money is tight and time is scarce, but I'm dedicated to get this shit up. So, here's what I'm going to do:

Getting some basic passive income up by running auto-surfing websites as much as I can. Claiming 1-2 times per day from a crypto faucet (takes so little time that i consider it passive). Using this income to invest into more sustainable passive income businesses like for example my t-shirt business or stockphotography. Designing a few designs every week to additionally get it going. Endgame: Youtube-Channel in the tutoring niche of a highly demanded but not yet provided topic in my subject. Maybe a unrelated health blog with affiliate links, let's see. Daydreaming, man. However, in this post I will just focus on the stuff you don't need time or money for to generate a basic passive income each month. I really encourage you to use this income to invest in further sources of passive income as they are all very unsustainable, but a good way to get that shit started.

But yeah, back to the small stuff´for now. Websites that generate passive income simply for leaving them open. It's called autosurfing and it's basically a website that pays you a small amount of money each minute to keep a tab open that redirects you to several sites. It is financed by websites paying the owner to get traffic. Most of them are fairly new so there is no payment proof for all of them yet and maybe one or two can turn out as a scam, but I give them a shot. I mean, hey it's free and you do not need to invest either time or money to get started. Just keep them all open in a window and forget about them. Needless to say they do not make you rich. You better find out for yourself, it's a real easy way to get some extra bucks. The links are ref-links which give both of us a small bonus. I will list pay per minute, minimum payout and max per month if you manage to run them 24/7 (which I don't, but maybe some of you are interested in it). You can cash out via paypal. Starting the list with the highest-paying ones. They all have the same layout, you just need to register individually for each one and click the start earning button.

1) Autosurfing

Cashmining.org $0,001/min. Min Withdrawal: $10. Max/30days: $43,2
This one seems too good to be true. But if they are legit I don't want to be the one missing out. Especially as it takes no effort at all to get it running and you can't lose, right? Can be a bit buggy when registrating. Just try a few times in case that happens.
getcashfree.info $0,0002/min. Min Withdrawal: $3. Max/30days: $8,46
Second highest paying one. Fairly new.
fastcashmining.com $0,00015/min. Min Withdrawal: $2,50. Max/30days: $6,48
miningtraffic.com $0,00012/min. Min Withdrawal: $1,50. Max/30days: $5,19
cashminingbot.com $0,0001/min. Min Withdrawal: $1,00. Max/30days: $4,32
moneymining.xyz $0,0001/min. Min Withdrawal: $2,00. Max/30days: $4,32
fancitos.com $0,0001/min. Min Withdrawal: $2,00. Max/30days: $4,32 -> spanish one, but easy to navigate

EDIT: There are some new now. I wrote a guide about autosurfing on medium to get you started. Check it out!

This can stack up to $76,29 a month if run 24/7. You get the point. If you only leave them open for 12 hours a day it's still like $38 dollar. There are also premium programs which can increase your earnings even further, but I want a few payments from a site before I look into them. There are few other websites which I skip here because the minimum withdrawal is way too high for the rate they pay or they're not available in english.

Another similiar website I can recommend is ebesucher.com. You can use their surfbar and it automatically directs you to websites that pay ebesucher money for traffic. Just like the other sites. It's a bit hard to calculate here since points per visited site do vary, but I estimate that it pulls in about $6 max per month if run non-stop.

Get all these websites running in one window and add radioearn.com for another roundabout $8,75 a month. You simply have to open 4 tabs with a radio (you can mute them) and get paid 1 point every 15 minutes. 1000 Points translate into $3,05 (January 19).

There are also Apps that pay you cash for swiping a banner away every time you unlock your phone or pay you to receive a few test-sms every other day, but I haven't looked into them yet. I will do so soon and update the post. Oh, and don't forget phone farming! True effortless passive income is real lol.

Well, wanna hear more options how you can easily earn some money each month with very low effort? Don't be afraid of cryptos if you aren't into them yet. You'll get into them pretty soon, I promise. And you should definitely give them a try considering that they can rise pretty high in value and can easily be converted to cash if you don't want to keep them. Free money is money, after all.

2) Cryptocurrency

So, now at first you need a wallet to do anything with bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. There are a lot of free alternatives, just search the internet to get started. Personally, I use Atomic-wallet on my Laptop.

Next step you need to register on Coinpot.co. It is a microwallet where all your earnings from the following faucets are directly transfered to without a fee. A faucet is a website with a lot of ads on it that pays the visiter a share of the revenue in cryptocoin. Problem with most faucets is that you can claim the same amount of cryptos every set time, for example all 15 minutes you get 30 satoshi (bitcoin-unit), but if you claim every 50 minutes you'll also get 30 satoshi. And in most cases you need to accumulate a very big amount of coins to get them transferred to your wallet. This is not the problem with coinpot, however. The featured faucets all stack up. This is the big advantage. You can claim them every 5 minutes, but also only once a day or even every second day and the amount you get will still keep on getting higher. The withdrawal amount to get them to your wallet is also very low (3,6$ worth of cryptos) and can be easily reached within like 15 days. So yeah, I recommend you to get yourself a second e-mail for coinbot and the following stuff. Coinpot has a really nice layout and supports 5 different cryptocurrencies (Litecoin, Bitcoin, Bitcoincash, Dash, Dogecoin), which you can exchange for one another without fees. I always transfer all my cryptocoins and the tokens (you get tokens as bonus points every claim) to bitcoin to be able to withdraw them faster. Okay, so here's what you do:

You register on coinpot. And then you sign up with the same mail on these faucets:
Moonbitcoin faucet for Bitcoin
Moonlitecoin faucet for Litecoin
Moondogecoin faucet for Dogecoin
Moondashcoin faucet for Dash
Moonbitcoincash faucet for Bitcoincash
Bitfun another faucet for Bitcoin
(If you have some more spare time you can also join Bonusbitcoin, it won't stack up, but you can claim every 15 minutes and it will reward you with a daily bonus. Pays pretty decent, but isn't really that passive.

Here's how it works: The amount you get will stack up until you claim. When you claim you need to resolve a short chapta to prove you're human and you will receive your cryptos directly in your coinpot wallet. You will get tokens for each claim you make which you can exchange for cryptos. You will also receive a bonus each time you claim. +1% per each day you claim in a row and a random bonus between 0-100% which is really cool especially when you wait long for them to stack up and then receive some 87% bonus lol. You can claim every 5 minutes if you want, but it's not really worth your time. I suggest claiming them 1-2x a day, only 1x for the most passive way and to get your daily bonus going up. I claim them every now and then, mostly like 1-3x a day, sometimes when I'm on my laptop anyway and bored more often and I generate like $5 worth of cryptos a month. Considering you don't do anything but click the captchas a few times a day which takes you like 2 minutes for all of them it's a very nice small income stream.

Another cryptorelated thing which truly is completely passive is Mannabase. You should definitely check them out! They have a very appealing website and their vision is to create a universal basic income for every human being. You need to register, verify your ID to them and they will pay you some Manna every week without you doing anything. You can exchange this coin for bitcoin or dollar then.

3) Other stuff

This isn't actually passive, but I always keep Profilic.ac open, when I'm on my laptop. It is an academic survey portal that actually pays very high (like 9 British Pounds) per hour. They don't have many surveys, so I'll always let the window open and check from time to time if there is a survey I can reserve for myself.

I sometimes also use Grindabuck.com for some passive video watching and the daily check in bonus. Video section is a bit buggy though, so you need to babysit it a little more than the autosurf-websites. It's like Swagbucks where you can fill out surveys and stuff. But I don't invest much time on those, just do a survey once a while to get to the withdrawal amount on those. Oh, and Swagbucks is pretty nice for Cashback here in Germany.

So, yeah. That's my guide to all of the shit I do on the internet lol. You can easily pull in up to $80-90 a month if you're dedicated. It's up to you how much you use this stuff, but I think it's a good start to passive income. I aim for a minimum of $40 a month to invest in my more sustainable passive income businesses and try not to miss any free opportunities on my way. Right now I got a browser window open making money for me and another one with cryptos waiting to be claimed while I write this post. You could do that, too! Absolutely no effort besides the initial setup. If you use my referral-links you get some bonuses, support my journey and I hope you can start yours soon, too.

So long. Happy earnings and keep grinding!
submitted by kryptanthrax to clicksforbeermoney [link] [comments]

My Personal Reviews of IPTV services I've tried

Hi everyone. Figured i'd add my own honest review of services I've tried so as to help those that might be looking for an iptv provider to use. I cut the cable completely since Aug of 2015. I'll list the services I've used in order of date used and subscription length. Hopefully i'll keep updating this list as I go.
I own an Element Ti4 android box and a HTPC windows 10 PC both running the latest version of kodi with an 8MB connection.

Predominantly my focus was on USA English channels, Sports (NBA, NFL, MMA & Boxing), Kids cartoons and News.

1. NFPS (1 year subscription. Bought 2 subs, One for the kids) = This was my first foray into the paid subscriptions. I was using their free service for serveral months and decided to subscribe when they went paid. They have an extensive channel lineup with all the major NFL, NBA, Tennis, Boxing and MMA channels that I required. None of them are HD. 480p at best. Setup is horrible and not for novices. Whenever they make a change to their servers, you get NO COMMUNICATION from them whatsoever. You have to be trolling the iptv forums to find out what to do to fix the service. HOWEVER, if you make it through all that, it is pretty stable. For $100/yr, it's constantly been my to go service when I want something stable. I must admit though, during major PPV events, its unwatchable, too much buffering. Otherwise, it works. Has the best EPG I've seen thus far as it integrates with PVR stalker addon in Kodi nicely and all your major epg addons like IVUE, ONTAPP etc. For the US crowd, it actually has the US version of CNN, Disney jr, Nick etc. Unlike the other services I've tried that have the british versions. There is no record capability. No TV catchup service. Can only use on one device at a time. Hence why I bought 2 subs.

  1. Ruya Mbox (trial sub, One month sub) - Great customer service. This reseller responds and communicates via his facebook. Setup was a breeze, you pay via paypal and within 24hrs, I had a username, pwd and setup instructions for Kodi to install the addon. All you do is input your user and pwd and you are good to go. No messing around with donation #s, device ID etc like you do with stalker NFPS. It just works out the box. PROS: Quality is HD. Crystal clear. Works perfect. No buffering even during PPV events. Coming from NFPS, it looked amazing. His addon also integrates easier with some of the EPG providers out there like ONTAPP, IVUE. Even if it doesn't, you just need to tweak a few files in the kodi folder to get it to work. However its not a full integration, you don't see all the RUYA channels listed in the epg.
CONS: Most expensive iptv service out there I believe. I think I paid $25 for a month. About $170-$200 for a year sub. Still cheaper than cable. It does NOT integrate with PVR stalker and hence there is no EPG. For me, that remains a big let down. The interface leaves much to be desired. I like to channel surf based on whats currently showing at the moment. I don't have a channel in mind, I look through the listings and decide. But with this, you pretty much need to know what you want to watch, then scroll through the different channel groups to find your channel. Another issue I noticed was that it would sometimes just kick you out of the feed after a short while sometimes less than 30 mins. Sometimes less than 5 mins. I hate that because sometimes I need to work and I want to keep my kids busy with Disney jr and I hate having them interrupt me ever so often because it froze or kicked them out. You will get that with Ruya. The content is also geared towards the UK market hence few US channels. Hence check their channel listing first before you buy. The UI leaves much to be desired. Has a folder structure view. Hence its not something the wife might be able to use on her own.

SUMMARY: If you can get over the lack of a full EPG and the timeouts/freezes, then this is by far the most visually stunning and buffer free experience I've had. There is no record capability. It has TV catchup service but not for all channels. Mostly only with the UK channels. Can only use on one device at a time.

3) Ruya xl (One month sub) - Same review pretty much as mbox as it is the same RUYA service, just different resellers. Setup is done by emailing them. Response time is within 24hrs. He will send you a paypal link for payment. Instructions for setup are on the website. His service looks exactly the same as Mbox except he has a Kodi build which he integrates the add-on into IVUE so that you can have an epg. However, like Mbox, you don't see ALL the channels listed in the EPG. Same issues as with Mbox, it will timeout quick and sometimes kick you out.

4) IPTV Express full pkg (One month sub) - This is also called IPTV Black diamond with other resellers. Pros: 4k and full HD channels. Over 1600 channels. Once you've paid, you send them your MAC and they send you an android apk to install. App looks quite good. Great EPG. Customer service responded to all my questions. Setup was quite easy.
CONS: Cannot use with Kodi. Only way to use this on a windows PC is by installing bluestacks and emulating android to run the apk. Hence this package is geared mostly towards android boxes, MAGS and Avovs. No record service. TV catchup is only for the Indian channels or so. Nothing for the English ones. Majority of the 1600 channels DO NOT work. You just get a black screen. Their channel lineup is falsely advertised as majority of the US and major sports channels are contained in a "bonus channels" folder which does not work. UFC, NFL, NBA, boxnation channels DO NOT work. All the NFL and NBA channels are in the bonus folder sadly....and don't work. This service though UHD, is virtually unwatchable. Buffers every few seconds literally. Then it kicks you out. Really sad cos they have such a great looking apk and excellent channel lineup but NOTHING works. Maybe someone with a 100Mb connection might have better luck, but with my 8MB, it was unwatchable. However many of the reviews on the napster forum also express my sentiment. Hence I think its a general problem with their servers.
5) SMOOTHSTREAMSTV (3 month sub) Discovered about this service here on the reddit iptv board. Was added to the private board where I found the link to pay via paypal. Currently offer only 3mos and 6 mos subscriptions. I used this on my windows 10 HTPC. I believe they also offer an android apk which I haven't tried. This is not compatible with MAG boxes
PROS: Once you've paid, you immediately receive login details. Whole process took less than 5 mins to get setup. Setting up with Kodi is as easy as downloading the addon and inputting your login details. This is a sports oriented service. This would appeal to many of the sport buffs out there looking for a sports focused iptv addon. It also has a few non-sports and news channels like CNN, FOX NEWs, FOX, ABC. However these aren't 24 hrs channels. Once a major sporting event is live, your news feed gets changed to that sporting event. Price was great also. $32 for 3 mos. About $10/mth. $59 for 6 months. You can't beat that. One PPV event sets you back $50 to $100 on cable. Quality of the channels are HD. Most are 720p. Look stunning. No buffering noticed on my 8Mb connection. However, if you do notice buffering, the fix is as easy as going into the addon settings and selecting a different server from a different state of the USA or different country in the world. They also have a good subreddit community where you can ask questions and receive quick feedback. It is definitely not like NFPS that you cant ever reach. They offer the option to record your streams. This is the 1st service I've tried that can. You can also use the same subscription on multiple TVs watching different channels at the same time instead of having to buy multiple subs like other services. When watching a channel, you DONT get kicked out after 20-30 mins. That was a big deciding factor for me. I left CNN on, went to work, came back, was still on. Love it. I also was able to watch several of the sunday night NFL games this past weekend. Not one buffered. Streamed perfectly. I also love the fact that they offer paypal as a payment option and not exclusively bitcoin. This tells me they are confident about their product service as paypal purchases can be disputed. Bitcoins cant. Plus your average Joe still hasn't heard of bitcoin nor even knows how to go about purchasing some. They accept paypal, bitcoin and bank transfer.
CONS: I personally wished they had more of a channel selection. Yes the sports are great. But I am still forced to shop for a different iptv provider because of the lack of any kids content. No Disney jr, Nick jr etc The record function though a huge bonus isn't fully implemented yet. You cannot record a program in the future. Only whats currently playing. That's the primary reason for wanting to record for most people. If I am available to watch the program, then why record it? What you want is the ability to schedule a recording, go to work and watch it once you come back over a beer. The channel switching is the slowest I've ever encountered. It could take up to 2 mins to switch channels. Sometimes more. However, I noticed it's much quicker on channels that you have watched recently. Maybe those with much quicker data connections might have better luck with this. For me, it was torturing. It's also not compatible with the MAG box. I believe the MAG is a huge segment of the IPTV market. That's disappointing. Even though you are provided with the multiple servers to chose from, I still believe it increases the learning curve a tad bit for newbies especially making it difficult for the wife or guest to operate on their own. So there is a level of technical know-how that is required to use this. Granted changing servers is as easy as going into the addon settings and choosing a different country from the menu option. However as most married men here would attest, that's still a few clicks too many for the wife to understand. Would have been nice if all that was done automatically by the addon and you did not need to fiddle with that. I tried selecting the auto server option, and I encountered a lot of buffering. Apparently that isn't properly implemented.
However I do believe the PROS far outweigh the CONS. With the exception of my not having any kids channels, I still think this is the best service I have tried till date. I heard they are planning to introduce more channels on Oct 1. If that happens, i'll update my review accordingly.
ACE IPTV REVIEW (Dec 3, 2016) I was contacted by the folks at ACE iptv to do a review of their service. I was given a 1 month sub for free to try it out. The offer a 1,3,6 & 12 month sub with prices starting at 10 pounds/mth for the full package. My testing was done with Kodi.
PROS: 1) multiple connections for viewing different channels in different rooms. 2) Can be used on MAG, KODI, Smart TVs and VLC via M3U. Couldn't test it on my MAG cos i had my MAC bound to another IPTV service im testing. But i've seen screenshots on their facebook page which seem to show that the interface looks better on the MAG. 3)Well structured channel listing layout organized in folders. 4) Good selection of channels from US, UK and CA. All having News, Entertainment, Music, Movies, Sports & Kids channel sections. 5)Decent EPG on Kodi. Same look as the Ruya EPG. Not a full featured one like you are used to with IVUE. It just shows the Currently playing program and whats coming up next. But i believe on the MAG and STB, you can get more of the future EPG listings. 6) Easy Setup - They give you the source address to add into kodi file manager, you download & install the app from the source, put in your username and password. Thats it. 7) Overall good selection of channels, most are HD 720p, some 576p. 8) The guys over there running this are friendly and up on things. They answer back pretty quickly to questions and concerns on their facebook group.
CONS: Well please note, it appears the service is still in its intimacy. Hence i believe maybe in a few months, many of these issues below will be sorted out. Frequent updates are also posted on their facebook page about server downtime. 1)I noticed alot of buffering on some of the channels. HBO HD & HBO family was unwatchable for me. 2) I like to conduct what i call the "babysitter proof" test. I like to be able to turn on my kids favorite cartoons in their bedroom and not hear a peep about it freezing or switching off every few minutes. Sadly, every now and then, the channel would go off on its own. I also tried leaving on a channel overnight, by morning, it was off. 3)In Kodi, i noticed a 5-10 second delay with channel switching. 4)The Kodi interface isn't eye pleasing. Wont impress your friends. However it is functional and well structured. 5) Some of the premium movie channels are not HD - Showtime and HBO Zone are in 480p 6)Tried watching the Dallas Cowboys game on Thanksgiving day. Worked perfect for the entire first half 720p. However heavy buffering at the beginning of the 2nd half forced me to complete the game on another iptv service.
CONCLUSION: ACE IPTV is still in its infancy and hence some of these issues are to be expected. I like the channel lineup. I like the admin that runs it. They are active on the facebook group. However the service still has alot more room for improvement. I hope they rectify the buffering and switching off issues. Also get more HD sources for the premium movie and sports channels.
CONCLUSION: Hence thus far, that's been my experience. I'm yet to find something to fit my needs. Sadly NFPS to date remains my most "stable" package. Once setup, even my wife can use it. However, I cant watch any major sports events on it. I had high hopes for RUYA but the lack of an EPG and its folder view structure makes it less user friendly and an ugly UI. IPTV express was a major letdown. For me, not worth the money.
I just bought a MAG box, waiting for it to arrive. Still on the hunt for a new cable-like experience that even my wife can use. I also need something that I can put on for my kids and walk away for an hour without being called back into the living room to fix. Hope this helps someone out there. I'm still open to trying new services, haven't given up yet. However, I'm only open to using services that will give a free trial or have a youtube video that have a detailed presentation of their service. As I try new services, I will continue to update this post and record my iptv journey. Thanks everyone.
Edit Sept 23rd 6pm: Just signed up for smoothstreamstv. Signed up for their 3 month Bronze package. Setup was instantaneous. It's set up as fast as it takes you to make a payment, check your email and download their repo into Kodi. Working perfectly so far. Will update my review after a few days of testing out the service.
Edit Sept 30th. Added smoothstreamstv review.
submitted by monuoha to IPTV [link] [comments]

Fall in love with the problem, not the solution.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with a writeup from Ahmad Iqbal.
Ahmad was one of the first people I interviewed at Starter Story for his bidet business. Now he's working on building Shopify apps and wrote this awesome post about his transition:
One of the best pieces of advice I was given was to Fall in love with the problem, not the solution. And it wasn’t until I came across a big problem that I realized how perfect this advice is.

My name is Ahmad Iqbal and I’m currently running two online businesses. I am both an Ecommerce Merchant as well as an Ecommerce App Developer.
The first of the two is my online store where I sell hand-held bidets. The later business, borne of the need to increase bidet sales, guided me to designing and developing apps for other merchants, like me.
In this post I want to illustrate how I made the leap from selling bidets online, to building an app design and development team. It’s strange for me to say it out loud, "how does one go from selling butt cleaning appliances to building and marketing apps?" So when Pat from Starter Story reached out to do a follow-up piece to my original post I was happy to try and put my experiences into words. Not just for others to read, but for myself in documenting my journey.
If the title hasn’t already given it away, this will be about my relationship with Problems.
I'm going to start at the middle (quiting my job) and then go to 2015 when this 'starter story' actually started, followed by the meat and potatos of the frameworks we use in our app development model.
My desk and kanban board

Quitting my Job & Making Money through Shopify Apps

From 2015 to 2017 I was working full-time at a global Big Four firm as a Senior Technology Consultant. My job was to help Fortune 1000 companies get their products to market faster. During my time growing my bidet store, I was starting to become more and more immersed in growth marketing. So much so, that I spun out a marketing framework I used for myself and called it the "Agile Marketing Framework" for the firm. Everything I was learning on my own time for growing my own business, was helping me be better for my big clients at my job. But even though doing well at work felt great, it was WAY more fun helping small businesses. In 2017 I had decided the world needs better small businesses, not bigger big businesses.
But in order to quit my job (my Nadeef bidet sales were taking a hit with my attention now diverted between my demanding full-time job, app design/development, and supporting Scout merchants) I needed to figure out if building apps on Shopify would be a viable business model. Was it even possible to earn a living selling apps full time?
It seemed like a tough proposition. I would need thousands of merchants paying at least $20/month to create a successful business. I didn’t think it would be possible, until I came across the Bold Commerce story. This four person team in Winnipeg, Manitoba, had almost the same story as us. Merchants first, identified gaps in the app store, and deciding to build apps on Shopify. Bold Commerce now employs almost 300 people, with no outside funding to date, and with their growth solely on the Shopify platform. This case study was enough to convince us to take the leap, I wanted us to be like Bold.
Having decided it was in fact possible to build positive cash flows through app subscriptions on Shopify, next thing we had to do was get our financing organized.
We decided to take three months to prepare and think about if this problem was something we wanted to dedicate the next several years of our lives to. This three month period was my time to save as much money as I could, and test my own conviction. This time was a constant decision making cycle, where I continually asked myself if the market was big enough, if the problem was widespread enough, and if I had the right pieces in place. It was an important lesson from my first startup attempt almost seven years earlier. In my first startup we picked the wrong market, at the wrong time, with no experience or resources, and the result was a four year uphill campaign that left us in pieces.
So before quitting my job, every dollar of income was saved, Bitcoins were cashed, plans to move out of my parent’s basement were halted, and I started creating a partner network across the ecommerce ecosystem.
We had enough to focus on building our apps for 36 months without worrying about money or raising venture capital. Today we’re on month 12 out of 36.

Let's Talk About the Failure First

Instead of jupming straight into Scout (the first app we built and the main subject of this post) let me first tell you about one of our apps that did not do well. Our "hand-written" notes app was attempted after the initial success of Scout, but it was a wake up call to stay focused on the problem, not the solution.
After quitting my job, and landing on the bigger problem of customer experience as our company mandate (more on this later), we decided to offer hand-written note services. We figured customers would love getting a handwritten note from merchants, so with little else research, or testing, we went ahead and started building out this crazy printer.
A video about how it worked
The app would connect to your Shopify backend, identify your VIP customers, and then convert that customer information into a special Adobe Illustrator script that would feed into the printer. The printer then would proceed to start writing the notes in a handwritten style font (both the letter copy and the addresses on the envelope).
We rolled this app out as an added skill to Scout. Basically, when Scout would alert you about the previous days’ VIP customers, it now offered an additional button labeled "Send Handwrote Card" which when pressed would instigate our printer. When the card was printed, I’d just have to put the postage stamp on it and drop it off at the post office which was across the street from our co-working space.
I believe this idea failed because I fell in love with the solution (cool looking robotic handwriting printer) rather than the problem it was designed to solve. I still believe there is value in this idea, but by overbuilding the solution first, we lost track of what was most important.
If I had to do it again I would have done a few things differently:
1. Manually write and fulfill the cards myself while doing the merchant discovery
Because there exists an intimate relationship between selling the service, and having to manually having to fulfill the service. It gives you more appreciation for the process and what’s important to do it successfully. Like with Scout, where I called my customers up manually through finding their details myself, and only after seeing how to do it well proceeded to systemize it with an app.
2. Personally talk to each merchant who wanted cards written
This would have been the best (only?) way to validate the value of the service. How important is this service for merchants? What else do they wish they could give as 'thank you's? What price would they be willing to pay on high volume handwritten cards? How much does it bother them that the cards are not personally written by the brand, and hence not authentic?
3. Write 0 lines of new code
Why divert precious development time and resources on something if A) it’s possible to do manually, and B) there is no guarantee that it’s a lucrative idea?
Thinking back, this idea was destined to fail for several reasons. Writing notes is very time consuming, there isn’t enough volume in the merchants who wanted to use it, the authenticity of the cards dies if customers figure out it’s not actually written by a person (even though it fooled almost anyone who looked at it). Even if we had done this the lean way and manually tested first, I still think we would have stopped offering the solution. But if I had just followed my four step Identify, Test, Build, Measure framework we would have saved the $4,000 we ended up spending designing and developing the software, and sourcing this printer and it’s parts. I would have found out in the Test section of the cycle that this is way too time consuming and merchants have too many questions about it to feel comfortable signing off on handwritten notes on high volume.
The handwritten note printer is now a piece of decoration at our office, but hey, at least it makes for a good conversation! And it taught me what I'm about to share with you today...

Identifying a Problem

Rewind back to 2015, a few months after opening my Nadeef hand-held bidet store on Shopify I found myself tackling the abandoned checkout problem, something every merchants probably faces. For every three potential customers that reached the final stage of checkout, one wasn’t pulling out their credit card. The way I saw it, I was leaking 33% of my sales in the final, most crucial, "moment of truth."
I was new to this field, I didn’t know the jargon or the best practices, all I knew was I needed to plug this hole. I went down a rabbit hole of recommendations, blog posts, forum threads, apps and YouTube videos. I tried many tactics, with varying degrees of "success" but later I realized I was asking myself the wrong question.
Instead of asking "How can I recovery these sales?" I should have been asking “Why are customer abandoning their checkout?”
At first I tried to extrapolate why they abandoned through the default go-to answers most blog posts claim are the reasons, like shipping timeframes, pricing, return policies, etc. But I knew these weren’t the real issues causing the abandoned cart because I would address them in my auto-recovery emails, exit-popups, Facebook retargeting campaigns, or all the other ways I would try to reduce abandons.
As simple as those recovery tactics may seem, I now know I was overthinking it. There was only one thing I could do to figure out why someone abandoned their checkout. Pick up the phone, and ask them one-on-one.
Before I go on, I should state that my recovery rate at this point was around 10%. And Shopify’s dashboard told me this was a good thing. I just didn’t think that was good at all. It meant that for every 10 people who reached the final stage of their checkout only one person actually returned to buy? Sure it's better than $0, but what about the other 90% who aren't returning? Surely we could do better than 1/10...
...and I wanted to talk to those nine people.
Calling my abandoned checkout customers changed everything. It changed my whole perspective about how to do business, and it continues to change it even now. At first, there was hesitation to call up a customer out of the blue, but the desire to figure out the problem far outweighed any "worst-case" awkward conversation. Not to mention, they weren’t cold leads, these were highly interested customer who reached the final steps of making a purchase. In my head I kept telling myself this was exactly as if someone walked into a store, grabbed some items, placed them on the checkout counter, but just as they were about to pull out their wallet, they turned around and walked out the door. Wouldn’t the store owner ask what’s up? So I just smiled and dialled.
The results were tremendous.
I went from recovering 10% of my abandoned checkouts from auto-emails, to recovering 55% when I got them on the phone. Not only that but by gathering feedback and identifying holes in my offering the percentage of abandons slowly decreased as well.
I’ve outlined my learnings from calling customers in this diagram

Creating a Solution

I saw my process was working, but now I needed to systemize it so I could maintain consistency in my callbacks. I quickly learned that the longer I waited to call the abandoned customer back the less likely I would be able to recover the sale. I really just needed an alert app, one that would push notify me as soon as someone abandoned, tell me what products they left, and their phone number. There was nothing in the app store that provided this function.
Don’t get me wrong, there were tonnes of cart recovery apps available. The top results, the "Top 10" lists, all relied on exit-popups, and auto-emails. I didn’t want an app to take an auto-action by auto-sending an email, or auto-sending a Facebook message. I wanted to be told, so I could take action on it personally. I needed this because I learned how important the one-on-one relationship with my own customer was.
So I called up one of my friends, who was also the developer on my first start-up, and one weekend later Scout was born. It was stupid simple. 20 minutes after an abandoned checkout, Scout would email me with the key details I needed. When I got this email all I had to do was tap the phone number in the email and my phone would automatically start dialling. It wasn’t an exciting or sexy process. It wasn’t even very hard. There was no user interface to design, there was no website to develop, it was just a hacked prototype with one simple, useful, function. If an abandoned checkout, then email me. And it just took a weekend to build.
I used this prototype of Scout for my own needs for several months. It was easier to manage because I was push notified when I needed to take an action. It maintained my high recovery rate. And most importantly, it was fun to know when an abandon happened in real-time, it made my site feel more alive.
Bend the conversion curve
Having used it for a few months and not seeing any slowdown in its utility for my store, we decided this was a tactic every merchant should have in their sales strategy. We iterated on the first version of the email-only alert channel and made it a Facebook Messenger bot, sort of like a customer relationship focused personal assistant. Scout's job would be to alert merchants when a customer abandoned their checkout, and give you their checkout details.
So we published the free app in the Shopify App Store and one review at a time, we realized it was as useful for many others as it was for us. Merchants were sending thank you emails to us, and it was here we felt we had found our first glimmer of that ever illusive "Product-Market Fit."
You have to remember, during this time both my friend and I had full-time jobs, and I was also running my bidet store. Scout was in no way near something resembling a business. And we didn’t approach it at all to be its own business. We just wanted to put something out into the world that would have an impact. Plain and simple. Our first few installs came organically from the Shopify App Store, and a few weeks later we had a small spike as a result of Felix Thea’s Shopify Masters Podcast where, as a guest I spoke about Nadeef and mentioned Scout. We didn’t do any marketing for it until we reached about 1,000 merchants through organic search, which took over a year to achieve.
It felt good making an impact for so many entrepreneurs, but we didn’t feel we had anything to quit our jobs for, yet…

What is "Product-Market Fit"?

Finding product-market fit is a term used very frequently in the startup or entrepreneurial circles. If you’ve found product-market fit, it means you’ve figured out how to consistently deliver value to a group of people (and get paid as a result).
The two components in this equation are Product and Market. In my experience, the key is to start with the market. It’s important to start with the market because that’s the big immovable environment you’re in. It’s uncertain, it’s changing, there are producers and consumers operating in it already. One can’t create a market, one can only play in it, and so the market is the "hard part."
The product side of the equation is the easy part. These days if you can dream it, you can figure out how to make it, or get it made. For example, if you want to build a skateboard that can be converted into a surfboard, you could probably figure that out. Let's assume you've done that, it looks great, and has tonnes of cool features like an intergrated smartphone app! Awesome, great work!
But now that it's built, who’s going to buy it? Where do they live, what's the population of all the surf-friendly cities? Who suffers badly enough from carrying two boards? How big is the problem? How much are people willing to pay for this? How often do they need to buy parts/replace their boards?
The point is, if you confident in your answers to the above questions and your ability to establish a distribution and marketing strategy to your ideal target market, then it makes sense to start product developerment. The same rules apply for app development.
I will clarify that I didn’t think Scout had enough of a product-market fit at the time. I thought we had found some fit, but we still had (have) a long way to go. After all, it is a free app and no one pays for it, so we don’t really have a way to measure if it valuable enough that people pay for it.
The way this went down for us was simple. We were trying to solve my problem first. Being one of the participants in the "market" that had a problem with online sales, I slowly learned what I needed. And when I saw it helped/worked/was awesome, I had de-risked the product enough to feel comfortable going to market with it. In my case, it was as simple as publishing Scout to the app store AFTER knowing it was working for me.
Build, measure, learn diagram
This is again, why the advice of falling in love with the problem, is so great. Because it forces you to think about the market, and its needs, first.

Iterating the Product

Fast forward about a year after using Scout. I was looking through my list of customers, ordered from highest Lifetime Value (LTV) to lowest, and noticed something really fascinating. Eight out of my top 10 customers had originally abandoned their checkout and were individuals I had personally reached out over the phone. This means that by calling my abandoned checkout customers I was not only recovering the sale, but as a result they were turning into VIP customers.
This was a huge wake up call because it helped me understand the real problem in my online sales strategy. If calling my abandoned checkout customers resulted in them becoming loyal customers, what if I also called those who bought without abandoning? If the one-on-one phone call is the common denominator for the high retention rate, why not apply it to more customers?
Thinking back to the phone conversations over the previous 12 months I realized the most valuable bi-product of asking for feedback was not the sale itself. Rather, it was the lasting brand impression that a friendly, pre-sale service call had on my customer. Suddenly my high recovery rate made so much sense. The phone call earned trust with my customers and they were happy to come back and do business with me.
With this realization came clarity about our app focus. Creating customer conversations. Customer relationships are today's small business competitive advantage. And so Scout had its first major iteration, the opportunity we've decided to pursue is to enable customer relationships. We decided Scout’s job for each and every merchant that installs it, is to identify these relationship building opportunities and turn them into one-on-one conversations.
I like the below diagram (as opposed to the one earlier above) for explaining the concept in more detail because it outlines another key step, which is to test your hypothesis. Once you’ve identifying a new problem you want to solve, next thing you should do is run a test to see if your solution will work. If you can solve it, then you should build something to systemize it. If you can’t at least prove your hypothesis is true even a little bit, then I wouldn’t recommend investing more time in building a systemized solution (the product).
Identify/test/build/learn diagram
Once you’ve gone through the loop at least once, you should have identified opportunities for improvements, and this is where Scout is today. Currently we feel we’re on the Learn phase in our third loop.
For those who are interested in the math of our second "Measure" step as it related to my store’s results after 12 months using using Scout:
My top 10 customers had spent at least $600 on my store, through an average of 3 or more purchases. My top three had spent at least $1,000 in 5+ orders. As a comparison, the average customer LTV is $100.
Eight out of my top 10 overall customers were originally abandoned checkouts that I had called and recovered. They went on to be way more likely to become returning and word-of-mouth customers. Based on this, it was safe to say I needed to focus on getting more people on the phone, regardless of whether they abandoned first or not. This was the most recent learning which fueled the next round of product iterations.

Generating Installs

The Shopify App Store is pretty saturated today. There are so many apps on there already, many popular apps even have dozens of copycats. This makes it hard to market apps to merchants, because there is so much noise that’s keeping them from finding your app.
I wish I had some secret formula we used to grow our installs. What I will say is that the vast majority of installs come straight from app store ranking, which I believe is mostly dependant on the number of 5 star reviews and your usable of the right keywords. I’ve added a screenshot of our first 9 months below to show you what the growth looked like in the early days.
first 9 months of installs
You can see that for the first 4 months, we only generated 20 installs. And three of those were from my own store and a couple friends’. The other 17 I believe probably came from the Shopify Master Podcast that I was featured on. To be fair, remember that at this time we were not focused on Scout at all. I had my full-time job, as well as my bidet store, so there were no marketing efforts put into Scout whatsoever. So how did the growth suddenly pick up in January 2017?
I believe it had a lot to do with positive merchant reviews of the app. I think the app store’s algorithms started picking up the reviews we were generating and this caused a sort of upward cycle. Based on this, my advice would be, in order to grow your app installs, focus on your merchant support. Offer the best customer support you possibly can, and keep providing this level of support. It’s worked for us in the past, and it continues to work for us. Every few weeks when we generate several positive reviews in quick succession we watch our installs over the next few days, and it is noticeably larger.
Just like the theme of our apps, of enabling merchants to provide great customer experience, we do the same for our service. We are an app development merchant to business owners. We saw it working in terms of making product sales online, why wouldn’t it work for app companies trying to sell to other businesses?
So far the story checks out.

Customer Experience is Important (because it’s hard)

In my research around ecommerce success stories, I came across Zappos. Their business model was so on point I had to create some content around it in the form of several vlogs. Our series of vlogs talks about several topics around small businesses, especially the advantage that we have as small businesses. Hint: it has a lot to do with our ability to provide a superior customer experience.
To get back to Zappos, Zappos is an online shoe store based in Las Vegas, Nevada, that was eventually acquired by Amazon for $1.2 billion. It just sold shoes, the same shoes you’d find in any regular store, but it did so with a militant focus on the customer experience.
They do this so well that their business has a 75% repurchase rate. Even though it's an online retail business model, I strongly feel the same principles apply to all sorts of models, including SaaS, consulting, whatever.
So how did Zappos do this? They did this by reinvesting a portion of each sale’s revenue, back into the customer’s experience. So instead of taking $20 from $100 sale and giving it to Facebook or Google ads in the hope of acquiring a new customer, they would use that $20 to upgrade their shipping to overnight, send a free pizza, or offer unlimited free returns. This not only made sure they retained the customer (repurchasing customers spent more and bought more frequently), but they also created free word-of-mouth customers through the advocate marketing as a result of the great experience. Tony Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos went on to write a book called Delivering Happiness about this idea, which I would highly reccommend for all merchants.
Speaking of great books, another book also further opened my eyes to the lost opportunities at businesses who don’t focus on the customer experience. Joey Coleman’s Never Lose a Customer Again
opening chapter highlights an interesting ratio of 43:1. For every 43 books about sales or marketing, there is only one book about customer service, experience, or retention. That means the education around creating a customer far outweighs the education around keeping the customer. But why? It's a known fact retention provides more profitability than new acqusitions.
Thinking about why this is, I believe it has less to do with the difficulty of creating "wow" customer experiences, and more to do with how ridiculously easy it is to automate ads and marketing campaigns. I don’t think we’re against doing hard things, but when presented with the easy option, that’s what merchants will take.
Cycle of momentum
If the "orthodox" marketing tactics can be automated (and they can), you should also incorporate the unorthodox campaigns. Things like sending a free pizza and handwritten thank you notes, will close the loop for a complete marketing strategy.
Whether you’re marketing physical goods, or SaaS apps, or even professional services, it’s easy to want to automate everything. Automating Facebook and Google ads, automating email campaigns, automating chatbots, automating discounts, popups, and special offers, automating dropshipping; it’s really easy to do this, and the app stores are overflowing with apps that automate. It’s clear automation is the future, but there is no competitive advantage here.
And so in order to stand out, I’ve learned you can’t automate the hard things. You should try to do the important hard things personally, because it’s in those moments that you will build brand reputation and value.

More than One Solution (to the Problem)

We went from running a Shopify store earning several thousand dollars per month, to developing a suite of apps used by over 10,000 merchants.
Working on Scout, and seeing the success from it, we started ideating other ways of getting customers on the phone. Why does only an abandoned checkout need to result in the phone call? What if a customer is interested in purchasing but hasn’t clicked "add to cart" yet? To capture these unrealized leads we developed the callback app called Raven Callback. Raven turns website visits into qualified sales calls. It helped tremendously on my store, because it started to capture more leads due to its lightweight nature. I didn't think the contact/email form was working for me because it’s too much stuff for customers to type, and they perceive replies would take up to 48 hours, so why bother? Same with the livechat, since majority of small businesses don’t reply immediately. The “immediate” callback did wonders and customers continuously commented it was the best customer service they’ve experienced. So, we ran with Raven as well, based on the success I had with my own store we published it on the Shopify App Store.
Raven only has a few dozen merchants on our paid plans, but just those merchants have directly generated over $500,000 for themselves in sales over the past 3 months since we launched. Again, we’re seeing the phone channel as a great medium to close sales, and it works really well for certain products and services. I think any store that wants to have one-on-one conversations with customers, especially those who sell products over $200, should seriously consider the phone as a sales channel.

What’s Next

Now we’re working on publishing our third app, again, inspired from running my bidet store. It’s not phone related, but it is related to customer experience and building a relationship with your VIP customers. The app is called Pizza Party, and it sends free pizzas to those VIP customers.
Based on the learnings from the "failed" hand-written note product, this time, I'm focusing on more customer conversations about it before going ahead and publishing the app. We're not sure yet when we'll officially launch it, it's about half-way done, but I'm happy to chat with anyone who wants to use it for their store. It’s really fun and easy to use. When merchants install it they just outline the parameters of a "great" customer, like order value, lifetime value or order frequency, and then confirm which customers to send to. For example, if you consider any customer who spends at least $200 per order on your store as a “VIP” customer, then Pizza Party will send a free “thank you” pizza to that customer on your behalf. The merchant pays for the pizza, and we take a small percentage, but it’s super easy to get started and really fun to use. The feedback I was getting from my bidet customers who I sent free pizzas was just too awesome to pass up on this app idea. I sent free large cheese pizzas to customers who bought a few hundred dollars worth of bidets last winter and that small token of my appreciation turned into a few hundred dollars in more revenue; it was triple digit ROI. Customers said it was the best customer service they’ve ever had, ended up sharing the story with their friends, which then resulted in word-of-mouth sales.
If you’ve read this far you’ve probably put together the pattern here. I tried a marketing experiment for my Nadeef Bidet store, and if it worked really well I tried to systemize it. By focusing on solving our own problems first, we now have 3 apps, 3 more in private beta, and plans to roll out for several other platforms very soon. And thanks for reading! If you want to get in touch, or have any quetions, feel free to reach out via email or Instagram
I’ll sign off with a Haiku:
What better problem
Than the one you yourself face
To solve for others too
Liked this text interview? Check out the full interview with photos.
submitted by youngrichntasteless to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Fall in love with the problem, not the solution.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with a writeup from Ahmad Iqbal.
Ahmad was one of the first people I interviewed at Starter Story for his bidet business. Now he's working on building Shopify apps and wrote this awesome post about his transition:
One of the best pieces of advice I was given was to Fall in love with the problem, not the solution. And it wasn’t until I came across a big problem that I realized how perfect this advice is.

My name is Ahmad Iqbal and I’m currently running two online businesses. I am both an Ecommerce Merchant as well as an Ecommerce App Developer.
The first of the two is my online store where I sell hand-held bidets. The later business, borne of the need to increase bidet sales, guided me to designing and developing apps for other merchants, like me.
In this post I want to illustrate how I made the leap from selling bidets online, to building an app design and development team. It’s strange for me to say it out loud, "how does one go from selling butt cleaning appliances to building and marketing apps?" So when Pat from Starter Story reached out to do a follow-up piece to my original post I was happy to try and put my experiences into words. Not just for others to read, but for myself in documenting my journey.
If the title hasn’t already given it away, this will be about my relationship with Problems.
I'm going to start at the middle (quiting my job) and then go to 2015 when this 'starter story' actually started, followed by the meat and potatos of the frameworks we use in our app development model.
My desk and kanban board

Quitting my Job & Making Money through Shopify Apps

From 2015 to 2017 I was working full-time at a global Big Four firm as a Senior Technology Consultant. My job was to help Fortune 1000 companies get their products to market faster. During my time growing my bidet store, I was starting to become more and more immersed in growth marketing. So much so, that I spun out a marketing framework I used for myself and called it the "Agile Marketing Framework" for the firm. Everything I was learning on my own time for growing my own business, was helping me be better for my big clients at my job. But even though doing well at work felt great, it was WAY more fun helping small businesses. In 2017 I had decided the world needs better small businesses, not bigger big businesses.
But in order to quit my job (my Nadeef bidet sales were taking a hit with my attention now diverted between my demanding full-time job, app design/development, and supporting Scout merchants) I needed to figure out if building apps on Shopify would be a viable business model. Was it even possible to earn a living selling apps full time?
It seemed like a tough proposition. I would need thousands of merchants paying at least $20/month to create a successful business. I didn’t think it would be possible, until I came across the Bold Commerce story. This four person team in Winnipeg, Manitoba, had almost the same story as us. Merchants first, identified gaps in the app store, and deciding to build apps on Shopify. Bold Commerce now employs almost 300 people, with no outside funding to date, and with their growth solely on the Shopify platform. This case study was enough to convince us to take the leap, I wanted us to be like Bold.
Having decided it was in fact possible to build positive cash flows through app subscriptions on Shopify, next thing we had to do was get our financing organized.
We decided to take three months to prepare and think about if this problem was something we wanted to dedicate the next several years of our lives to. This three month period was my time to save as much money as I could, and test my own conviction. This time was a constant decision making cycle, where I continually asked myself if the market was big enough, if the problem was widespread enough, and if I had the right pieces in place. It was an important lesson from my first startup attempt almost seven years earlier. In my first startup we picked the wrong market, at the wrong time, with no experience or resources, and the result was a four year uphill campaign that left us in pieces.
So before quitting my job, every dollar of income was saved, Bitcoins were cashed, plans to move out of my parent’s basement were halted, and I started creating a partner network across the ecommerce ecosystem.
We had enough to focus on building our apps for 36 months without worrying about money or raising venture capital. Today we’re on month 12 out of 36.

Let's Talk About the Failure First

Instead of jupming straight into Scout (the first app we built and the main subject of this post) let me first tell you about one of our apps that did not do well. Our "hand-written" notes app was attempted after the initial success of Scout, but it was a wake up call to stay focused on the problem, not the solution.
After quitting my job, and landing on the bigger problem of customer experience as our company mandate (more on this later), we decided to offer hand-written note services. We figured customers would love getting a handwritten note from merchants, so with little else research, or testing, we went ahead and started building out this crazy printer.
A video about how it worked
The app would connect to your Shopify backend, identify your VIP customers, and then convert that customer information into a special Adobe Illustrator script that would feed into the printer. The printer then would proceed to start writing the notes in a handwritten style font (both the letter copy and the addresses on the envelope).
We rolled this app out as an added skill to Scout. Basically, when Scout would alert you about the previous days’ VIP customers, it now offered an additional button labeled "Send Handwrote Card" which when pressed would instigate our printer. When the card was printed, I’d just have to put the postage stamp on it and drop it off at the post office which was across the street from our co-working space.
I believe this idea failed because I fell in love with the solution (cool looking robotic handwriting printer) rather than the problem it was designed to solve. I still believe there is value in this idea, but by overbuilding the solution first, we lost track of what was most important.
If I had to do it again I would have done a few things differently:
1. Manually write and fulfill the cards myself while doing the merchant discovery
Because there exists an intimate relationship between selling the service, and having to manually having to fulfill the service. It gives you more appreciation for the process and what’s important to do it successfully. Like with Scout, where I called my customers up manually through finding their details myself, and only after seeing how to do it well proceeded to systemize it with an app.
2. Personally talk to each merchant who wanted cards written
This would have been the best (only?) way to validate the value of the service. How important is this service for merchants? What else do they wish they could give as 'thank you's? What price would they be willing to pay on high volume handwritten cards? How much does it bother them that the cards are not personally written by the brand, and hence not authentic?
3. Write 0 lines of new code
Why divert precious development time and resources on something if A) it’s possible to do manually, and B) there is no guarantee that it’s a lucrative idea?
Thinking back, this idea was destined to fail for several reasons. Writing notes is very time consuming, there isn’t enough volume in the merchants who wanted to use it, the authenticity of the cards dies if customers figure out it’s not actually written by a person (even though it fooled almost anyone who looked at it). Even if we had done this the lean way and manually tested first, I still think we would have stopped offering the solution. But if I had just followed my four step Identify, Test, Build, Measure framework we would have saved the $4,000 we ended up spending designing and developing the software, and sourcing this printer and it’s parts. I would have found out in the Test section of the cycle that this is way too time consuming and merchants have too many questions about it to feel comfortable signing off on handwritten notes on high volume.
The handwritten note printer is now a piece of decoration at our office, but hey, at least it makes for a good conversation! And it taught me what I'm about to share with you today...

Identifying a Problem

Rewind back to 2015, a few months after opening my Nadeef hand-held bidet store on Shopify I found myself tackling the abandoned checkout problem, something every merchants probably faces. For every three potential customers that reached the final stage of checkout, one wasn’t pulling out their credit card. The way I saw it, I was leaking 33% of my sales in the final, most crucial, "moment of truth."
I was new to this field, I didn’t know the jargon or the best practices, all I knew was I needed to plug this hole. I went down a rabbit hole of recommendations, blog posts, forum threads, apps and YouTube videos. I tried many tactics, with varying degrees of "success" but later I realized I was asking myself the wrong question.
Instead of asking "How can I recovery these sales?" I should have been asking “Why are customer abandoning their checkout?”
At first I tried to extrapolate why they abandoned through the default go-to answers most blog posts claim are the reasons, like shipping timeframes, pricing, return policies, etc. But I knew these weren’t the real issues causing the abandoned cart because I would address them in my auto-recovery emails, exit-popups, Facebook retargeting campaigns, or all the other ways I would try to reduce abandons.
As simple as those recovery tactics may seem, I now know I was overthinking it. There was only one thing I could do to figure out why someone abandoned their checkout. Pick up the phone, and ask them one-on-one.
Before I go on, I should state that my recovery rate at this point was around 10%. And Shopify’s dashboard told me this was a good thing. I just didn’t think that was good at all. It meant that for every 10 people who reached the final stage of their checkout only one person actually returned to buy? Sure it's better than $0, but what about the other 90% who aren't returning? Surely we could do better than 1/10...
...and I wanted to talk to those nine people.
Calling my abandoned checkout customers changed everything. It changed my whole perspective about how to do business, and it continues to change it even now. At first, there was hesitation to call up a customer out of the blue, but the desire to figure out the problem far outweighed any "worst-case" awkward conversation. Not to mention, they weren’t cold leads, these were highly interested customer who reached the final steps of making a purchase. In my head I kept telling myself this was exactly as if someone walked into a store, grabbed some items, placed them on the checkout counter, but just as they were about to pull out their wallet, they turned around and walked out the door. Wouldn’t the store owner ask what’s up? So I just smiled and dialled.
The results were tremendous.
I went from recovering 10% of my abandoned checkouts from auto-emails, to recovering 55% when I got them on the phone. Not only that but by gathering feedback and identifying holes in my offering the percentage of abandons slowly decreased as well.
I’ve outlined my learnings from calling customers in this diagram

Creating a Solution

I saw my process was working, but now I needed to systemize it so I could maintain consistency in my callbacks. I quickly learned that the longer I waited to call the abandoned customer back the less likely I would be able to recover the sale. I really just needed an alert app, one that would push notify me as soon as someone abandoned, tell me what products they left, and their phone number. There was nothing in the app store that provided this function.
Don’t get me wrong, there were tonnes of cart recovery apps available. The top results, the "Top 10" lists, all relied on exit-popups, and auto-emails. I didn’t want an app to take an auto-action by auto-sending an email, or auto-sending a Facebook message. I wanted to be told, so I could take action on it personally. I needed this because I learned how important the one-on-one relationship with my own customer was.
So I called up one of my friends, who was also the developer on my first start-up, and one weekend later Scout was born. It was stupid simple. 20 minutes after an abandoned checkout, Scout would email me with the key details I needed. When I got this email all I had to do was tap the phone number in the email and my phone would automatically start dialling. It wasn’t an exciting or sexy process. It wasn’t even very hard. There was no user interface to design, there was no website to develop, it was just a hacked prototype with one simple, useful, function. If an abandoned checkout, then email me. And it just took a weekend to build.
I used this prototype of Scout for my own needs for several months. It was easier to manage because I was push notified when I needed to take an action. It maintained my high recovery rate. And most importantly, it was fun to know when an abandon happened in real-time, it made my site feel more alive.
Bend the conversion curve
Having used it for a few months and not seeing any slowdown in its utility for my store, we decided this was a tactic every merchant should have in their sales strategy. We iterated on the first version of the email-only alert channel and made it a Facebook Messenger bot, sort of like a customer relationship focused personal assistant. Scout's job would be to alert merchants when a customer abandoned their checkout, and give you their checkout details.
So we published the free app in the Shopify App Store and one review at a time, we realized it was as useful for many others as it was for us. Merchants were sending thank you emails to us, and it was here we felt we had found our first glimmer of that ever illusive "Product-Market Fit."
You have to remember, during this time both my friend and I had full-time jobs, and I was also running my bidet store. Scout was in no way near something resembling a business. And we didn’t approach it at all to be its own business. We just wanted to put something out into the world that would have an impact. Plain and simple. Our first few installs came organically from the Shopify App Store, and a few weeks later we had a small spike as a result of Felix Thea’s Shopify Masters Podcast where, as a guest I spoke about Nadeef and mentioned Scout. We didn’t do any marketing for it until we reached about 1,000 merchants through organic search, which took over a year to achieve.
It felt good making an impact for so many entrepreneurs, but we didn’t feel we had anything to quit our jobs for, yet…

What is "Product-Market Fit"?

Finding product-market fit is a term used very frequently in the startup or entrepreneurial circles. If you’ve found product-market fit, it means you’ve figured out how to consistently deliver value to a group of people (and get paid as a result).
The two components in this equation are Product and Market. In my experience, the key is to start with the market. It’s important to start with the market because that’s the big immovable environment you’re in. It’s uncertain, it’s changing, there are producers and consumers operating in it already. One can’t create a market, one can only play in it, and so the market is the "hard part."
The product side of the equation is the easy part. These days if you can dream it, you can figure out how to make it, or get it made. For example, if you want to build a skateboard that can be converted into a surfboard, you could probably figure that out. Let's assume you've done that, it looks great, and has tonnes of cool features like an intergrated smartphone app! Awesome, great work!
But now that it's built, who’s going to buy it? Where do they live, what's the population of all the surf-friendly cities? Who suffers badly enough from carrying two boards? How big is the problem? How much are people willing to pay for this? How often do they need to buy parts/replace their boards?
The point is, if you confident in your answers to the above questions and your ability to establish a distribution and marketing strategy to your ideal target market, then it makes sense to start product developerment. The same rules apply for app development.
I will clarify that I didn’t think Scout had enough of a product-market fit at the time. I thought we had found some fit, but we still had (have) a long way to go. After all, it is a free app and no one pays for it, so we don’t really have a way to measure if it valuable enough that people pay for it.
The way this went down for us was simple. We were trying to solve my problem first. Being one of the participants in the "market" that had a problem with online sales, I slowly learned what I needed. And when I saw it helped/worked/was awesome, I had de-risked the product enough to feel comfortable going to market with it. In my case, it was as simple as publishing Scout to the app store AFTER knowing it was working for me.
Build, measure, learn diagram
This is again, why the advice of falling in love with the problem, is so great. Because it forces you to think about the market, and its needs, first.

Iterating the Product

Fast forward about a year after using Scout. I was looking through my list of customers, ordered from highest Lifetime Value (LTV) to lowest, and noticed something really fascinating. Eight out of my top 10 customers had originally abandoned their checkout and were individuals I had personally reached out over the phone. This means that by calling my abandoned checkout customers I was not only recovering the sale, but as a result they were turning into VIP customers.
This was a huge wake up call because it helped me understand the real problem in my online sales strategy. If calling my abandoned checkout customers resulted in them becoming loyal customers, what if I also called those who bought without abandoning? If the one-on-one phone call is the common denominator for the high retention rate, why not apply it to more customers?
Thinking back to the phone conversations over the previous 12 months I realized the most valuable bi-product of asking for feedback was not the sale itself. Rather, it was the lasting brand impression that a friendly, pre-sale service call had on my customer. Suddenly my high recovery rate made so much sense. The phone call earned trust with my customers and they were happy to come back and do business with me.
With this realization came clarity about our app focus. Creating customer conversations. Customer relationships are today's small business competitive advantage. And so Scout had its first major iteration, the opportunity we've decided to pursue is to enable customer relationships. We decided Scout’s job for each and every merchant that installs it, is to identify these relationship building opportunities and turn them into one-on-one conversations.
I like the below diagram (as opposed to the one earlier above) for explaining the concept in more detail because it outlines another key step, which is to test your hypothesis. Once you’ve identifying a new problem you want to solve, next thing you should do is run a test to see if your solution will work. If you can solve it, then you should build something to systemize it. If you can’t at least prove your hypothesis is true even a little bit, then I wouldn’t recommend investing more time in building a systemized solution (the product).
Identify/test/build/learn diagram
Once you’ve gone through the loop at least once, you should have identified opportunities for improvements, and this is where Scout is today. Currently we feel we’re on the Learn phase in our third loop.
For those who are interested in the math of our second "Measure" step as it related to my store’s results after 12 months using using Scout:
My top 10 customers had spent at least $600 on my store, through an average of 3 or more purchases. My top three had spent at least $1,000 in 5+ orders. As a comparison, the average customer LTV is $100.
Eight out of my top 10 overall customers were originally abandoned checkouts that I had called and recovered. They went on to be way more likely to become returning and word-of-mouth customers. Based on this, it was safe to say I needed to focus on getting more people on the phone, regardless of whether they abandoned first or not. This was the most recent learning which fueled the next round of product iterations.

Generating Installs

The Shopify App Store is pretty saturated today. There are so many apps on there already, many popular apps even have dozens of copycats. This makes it hard to market apps to merchants, because there is so much noise that’s keeping them from finding your app.
I wish I had some secret formula we used to grow our installs. What I will say is that the vast majority of installs come straight from app store ranking, which I believe is mostly dependant on the number of 5 star reviews and your usable of the right keywords. I’ve added a screenshot of our first 9 months below to show you what the growth looked like in the early days.
first 9 months of installs
You can see that for the first 4 months, we only generated 20 installs. And three of those were from my own store and a couple friends’. The other 17 I believe probably came from the Shopify Master Podcast that I was featured on. To be fair, remember that at this time we were not focused on Scout at all. I had my full-time job, as well as my bidet store, so there were no marketing efforts put into Scout whatsoever. So how did the growth suddenly pick up in January 2017?
I believe it had a lot to do with positive merchant reviews of the app. I think the app store’s algorithms started picking up the reviews we were generating and this caused a sort of upward cycle. Based on this, my advice would be, in order to grow your app installs, focus on your merchant support. Offer the best customer support you possibly can, and keep providing this level of support. It’s worked for us in the past, and it continues to work for us. Every few weeks when we generate several positive reviews in quick succession we watch our installs over the next few days, and it is noticeably larger.
Just like the theme of our apps, of enabling merchants to provide great customer experience, we do the same for our service. We are an app development merchant to business owners. We saw it working in terms of making product sales online, why wouldn’t it work for app companies trying to sell to other businesses?
So far the story checks out.

Customer Experience is Important (because it’s hard)

In my research around ecommerce success stories, I came across Zappos. Their business model was so on point I had to create some content around it in the form of several vlogs. Our series of vlogs talks about several topics around small businesses, especially the advantage that we have as small businesses. Hint: it has a lot to do with our ability to provide a superior customer experience.
To get back to Zappos, Zappos is an online shoe store based in Las Vegas, Nevada, that was eventually acquired by Amazon for $1.2 billion. It just sold shoes, the same shoes you’d find in any regular store, but it did so with a militant focus on the customer experience.
They do this so well that their business has a 75% repurchase rate. Even though it's an online retail business model, I strongly feel the same principles apply to all sorts of models, including SaaS, consulting, whatever.
So how did Zappos do this? They did this by reinvesting a portion of each sale’s revenue, back into the customer’s experience. So instead of taking $20 from $100 sale and giving it to Facebook or Google ads in the hope of acquiring a new customer, they would use that $20 to upgrade their shipping to overnight, send a free pizza, or offer unlimited free returns. This not only made sure they retained the customer (repurchasing customers spent more and bought more frequently), but they also created free word-of-mouth customers through the advocate marketing as a result of the great experience. Tony Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos went on to write a book called Delivering Happiness about this idea, which I would highly reccommend for all merchants.
Speaking of great books, another book also further opened my eyes to the lost opportunities at businesses who don’t focus on the customer experience. Joey Coleman’s Never Lose a Customer Again
opening chapter highlights an interesting ratio of 43:1. For every 43 books about sales or marketing, there is only one book about customer service, experience, or retention. That means the education around creating a customer far outweighs the education around keeping the customer. But why? It's a known fact retention provides more profitability than new acqusitions.
Thinking about why this is, I believe it has less to do with the difficulty of creating "wow" customer experiences, and more to do with how ridiculously easy it is to automate ads and marketing campaigns. I don’t think we’re against doing hard things, but when presented with the easy option, that’s what merchants will take.
Cycle of momentum
If the "orthodox" marketing tactics can be automated (and they can), you should also incorporate the unorthodox campaigns. Things like sending a free pizza and handwritten thank you notes, will close the loop for a complete marketing strategy.
Whether you’re marketing physical goods, or SaaS apps, or even professional services, it’s easy to want to automate everything. Automating Facebook and Google ads, automating email campaigns, automating chatbots, automating discounts, popups, and special offers, automating dropshipping; it’s really easy to do this, and the app stores are overflowing with apps that automate. It’s clear automation is the future, but there is no competitive advantage here.
And so in order to stand out, I’ve learned you can’t automate the hard things. You should try to do the important hard things personally, because it’s in those moments that you will build brand reputation and value.

More than One Solution (to the Problem)

We went from running a Shopify store earning several thousand dollars per month, to developing a suite of apps used by over 10,000 merchants.
Working on Scout, and seeing the success from it, we started ideating other ways of getting customers on the phone. Why does only an abandoned checkout need to result in the phone call? What if a customer is interested in purchasing but hasn’t clicked "add to cart" yet? To capture these unrealized leads we developed the callback app called Raven Callback. Raven turns website visits into qualified sales calls. It helped tremendously on my store, because it started to capture more leads due to its lightweight nature. I didn't think the contact/email form was working for me because it’s too much stuff for customers to type, and they perceive replies would take up to 48 hours, so why bother? Same with the livechat, since majority of small businesses don’t reply immediately. The “immediate” callback did wonders and customers continuously commented it was the best customer service they’ve experienced. So, we ran with Raven as well, based on the success I had with my own store we published it on the Shopify App Store.
Raven only has a few dozen merchants on our paid plans, but just those merchants have directly generated over $500,000 for themselves in sales over the past 3 months since we launched. Again, we’re seeing the phone channel as a great medium to close sales, and it works really well for certain products and services. I think any store that wants to have one-on-one conversations with customers, especially those who sell products over $200, should seriously consider the phone as a sales channel.

What’s Next

Now we’re working on publishing our third app, again, inspired from running my bidet store. It’s not phone related, but it is related to customer experience and building a relationship with your VIP customers. The app is called Pizza Party, and it sends free pizzas to those VIP customers.
Based on the learnings from the "failed" hand-written note product, this time, I'm focusing on more customer conversations about it before going ahead and publishing the app. We're not sure yet when we'll officially launch it, it's about half-way done, but I'm happy to chat with anyone who wants to use it for their store. It’s really fun and easy to use. When merchants install it they just outline the parameters of a "great" customer, like order value, lifetime value or order frequency, and then confirm which customers to send to. For example, if you consider any customer who spends at least $200 per order on your store as a “VIP” customer, then Pizza Party will send a free “thank you” pizza to that customer on your behalf. The merchant pays for the pizza, and we take a small percentage, but it’s super easy to get started and really fun to use. The feedback I was getting from my bidet customers who I sent free pizzas was just too awesome to pass up on this app idea. I sent free large cheese pizzas to customers who bought a few hundred dollars worth of bidets last winter and that small token of my appreciation turned into a few hundred dollars in more revenue; it was triple digit ROI. Customers said it was the best customer service they’ve ever had, ended up sharing the story with their friends, which then resulted in word-of-mouth sales.
If you’ve read this far you’ve probably put together the pattern here. I tried a marketing experiment for my Nadeef Bidet store, and if it worked really well I tried to systemize it. By focusing on solving our own problems first, we now have 3 apps, 3 more in private beta, and plans to roll out for several other platforms very soon. And thanks for reading! If you want to get in touch, or have any quetions, feel free to reach out via email or Instagram
I’ll sign off with a Haiku:
What better problem
Than the one you yourself face
To solve for others too
Liked this text interview? Check out the full interview with photos.
submitted by youngrichntasteless to EntrepreneurRideAlong [link] [comments]

A Non-Comprehensive List of some Passive Beermoney Sites

Non-Comprehensive because it's certainly not a complete list; I'm sure there are more I don't know about!
Hello fellow Beermoney earners! For the past few months I've been searching for ways to earn money passively (or as passively as possible). This guide will not cover any kind of Bitcoin/Dogecoin/etc. Mining, faucets, etc. Thus far, I would say I've been pretty successful. I'm not rich and I'm not making hundreds, but the methods I'll outline below are pretty much little/no effort beyond getting set up. I'll provide payment proofs to any of the methods below if you ask for them, if available. I will mention but not elaborate on the common/already well known methods, as we already get enough of that and I won't contribute to the spam. The following sites are in no particular order. I'll also happily answer any questions, but I ask that you at least explore the site and try to find things before asking me what to do.
NOTE: I know I'm going to get at least one person saying "Not worth it, power bills, electricity, global warming, illuminati, etc. etc. etc.". I'd like to stop that person right here and tell them that yes, in theory, this could cost you more in power than it could make you. If you don't pay for your power, then it's irrelevant. If you DO pay for your power, then you can use these methods only when your computer would normally be on and the problem pretty much goes away. If your computer is always on anyways, only the CPU-renting methods will likely have any impact on your power bills (if any). I would rather not debate this. If you feel that it's not worth it, you're welcome to not try any of these.
INTERNATIONAL NOTE: I believe that all of these except for Qmee, Perk TV and Bing Rewards, are international, at least partially. I could be wrong, and if anybody knows I'm wrong please let me know and I will make edits as necessary.
eBesucher ---- Non-ref is a passive surfbar site, and one I've been using the longest. Simply open a surfbar tab and let it go. eBesucher also created a small program called the "Restarter" that will monitor your surfbar tab in whatever browser you choose and restart the browser if the surfbar stops (due to frambreakers, shitty site scripts, etc.). Other than that, it requires no input. Run this in whatever browser you don't use; it works in Firefox, Chrome, IE, and Safari. If you use Firefox, it also comes with an extension that will monitor your surfbar and give you double points when you hit a framebreaker site, but I've found it doesn't work as well as the Restarter at fixing the surfbar when you run over faulty scripts. eBesucher requires no attention checks and is 100% automated. You can also get a few cents for reading mails sent to your in-site Inbox (or actual email inbox if you choose). Minimum payout is 2 Euro, PayPal (and some others) accepted. Payout is manual.
4PTP ---- Non-ref is a Pay-to-Promote site, one of the only ones I've found that pays anything worthwhile. Simply send traffic to your link (however you'd like to do that, such as HitLeap (which I will mention below)) and you'll rack up points which convert to cash every 6 hours. Note that this site DOES accept traffic from traffic exchanges, etc., but be aware that your promote link is a very "intense" site; there's a lot of frames of activity and some traffic exchanges may not like that. Beyond Hitleap, it might take a few tries to find one that works. Minimum payout is $2, to PayPal and others. Payout is manual. NOTE: It is normal for a large amount of your traffic to not be counted. I don't know why this is, but it might be a side effect of traffic exchanges (or things like AdBlock, no java, etc.). Also NOTE: 4PTP might be rejected by Hitleap. If this happens, just wait a little while and try again. I had it rejected after working fine for almost a month, and I just resubmitted it a day later and it was fine.
Ysear.ch ---- Non-ref EDIT: They WILL eventually ban you if you don't use HitLeap premium, so if you don't have it, I wouldn't recommend this anymore. is a link monetizer (like Adf.ly). Shorten links, have people click those links, get money. Normally that would be a very slow process, but Ysear.ch works with Hitleap (again, I'll explain below). I want to note that while I and some others have been paid, you might end up banned, especially if you don't have a Premium Hitleap account so you can use randomized or directed traffic. Be aware of this. When using Ysear.ch for Hitleap, make sure your shortened ads are "Framed Banner", not "Interstitial" (under More Options, when shrinking your link). Payouts are automatic on the 6th of each month. I think the minimum is $2.50.
Hitleap ---- Non-ref is a pretty well-known traffic exchange site, so I won't go too much into it (PM me if you need more info, though). Submit your link(s) from sites like 4PTP and Ysear.ch and run the Hitleap Viewer as often as possible to rack up minutes, which will automatically be spent on directing traffic to your links. I personally use 15 seconds for all of my links, but I imagine you could get away with 11 or 12; adding a few seconds helps make sure the site loads. Upgrading to Premium can be worth it, and lets you add more links and spoof the traffic source. Your choice.
LinkCollider is another traffic exchange site. (Note: I didn't include a referral link because I don't think it matters unless someone buys something.) This one is a bit different from Hitleap, but works in pretty much the same way. Submit your links (up to 3), and then do activities such as autosurf, manual surf, "Like" FB pages, Retweet things, etc. to build up coins which are automatically spent on having your sites viewed, Liked, Shared, etc.. I personally turn off all social media for my links, since I'm pretty sure it will be wasted compared to just getting raw views to your website. The interface might be a little confusing at first, but it only takes a little exploring to get the hang of it.
Qmee ---- Non-ref is very well known in this subreddit so I'll be very brief for the couple of people who might not know- Download extension, click ads that show up when you search on Google, Amazon, eBay, and Bing, and cashout to Paypal. No minimum amount. I have found that your earnings decrease over time if you click the ads and do not interact with them, and/or click a lot of ads for the same search. Try not to abuse the system by obviously searching for things you have no interest in, as I think the system is actually kind of smart and might pick up on that. I could be wrong though. This method is not 100% passive but requires very little effort.
Slicify ---- Non-ref is a CPU rental service. Download their control panel (and Oracle VMBox, which comes with it) and your computer will automatically have its processing rented out. Save yourself the time and check that your computer can operate virtual machines (Slicify can help you determine this). You get paid for every hour your computer is being rented, from .01/hr and up. When your computer is being rented, it will likely take up a lot of memory and processing (though you can customize how much of your system's resources you're renting out) so if you want to do stuff like play games, turn this off while you're doing it. You can also set up a schedule so it will only run when you wouldn't be using your computer anyways. Minimum payout is $5, manually to PayPal. If you have access to multiple computers (I strongly recommend desktop only unless your laptop has excellent cooling/ventilation), you can run this on multiple machines.
GomezPeerZone ---- Non-ref is another CPU renting application. You can run it concurrently with Slicify, though if both are going at once it will probably eat a lot of resources. A major note here is that you are not earning with GomezPeer from day 1. You have to be approved, and this takes an undetermined amount of time, during which you need to run the software and you lose your earnings each month. Once you do get approved, you'll earn automatically and get any earnings you made in the month you were approved. I believe payouts are automatic, to PayPal. You can also run this on multiple machines at once.
MQL5 Cloud Strategy Testing Agent (no referrals as far as I know) is a minor CPU "renting" service. Download their program, sign up with MQL5, and then open up some testing agents (the download site will provide instructions). You won't make much with this, maybe up to 60 cents a month, but it is 100% passive, non-invasive, and takes up little/no resources. Payout is to Paypal, no minimum but it does take a small commission. You can run this on multiple machines.
ScreenwiseTrends Panel (no referrals) is similar to Synapster in that it tracks your browser usage; this one is run by Google who is already monitoring everything you do and every piss you take anyways. You get $1 per week your computer is active (plus $.50 for a tablet and $.50 for a smartphone, if applicable) with the Chrome extension. Payout is at $25, so this is a slow earner. Like above, if you're not cool with being monitored like this, feel free to skip over it.
Perk TV ---- Non-ref is a video-watching app similar to Swagbucks TV available on iOS and Android; Perk also has other apps you can use for rewards. This has gotten the rounds on the subreddit recently, so I'll be brief: Watch app trailers and earn points. PerkTV automatically loops the videos endlessly, no attention checks needed. Minimum payout is a $2 Amazon giftcard at 2500 points. There's a lot of other gift cards at the $5 level if you so choose. You can get $5 to PayPal for 9000 points but it is really not worth it. At all.
Some would consider Apptrailers (iOS, Android) to be passive, if you don't mind pressing "OK" and "Play" every 30-45 seconds for half a cent each. I did do this for a while, like when watching Netflix, but I prefer the video apps like Perk TV and SBTV now. You're welcome to do this.
Peko (iOS) is also passive, kinda-sorta. It's a weird little app that pays you to play a silly little game with people. You can idly spam the "Peko me!" emote in the Scramble Match room until you get "Peko'd", play the games, and then cash out at the minimum of $10. I did this a lot; cashed out about 6 times, and then got absolutely sick of it and stopped. I might pick it up again, but it's what I would consider passive in theory.
Bing Rewards I also do Bing Rewards using a bot. If you don't know about Bing Rewards, check out the "Most Commonly Posted Beermoney Sites" sticky and sign up from there. It's not 100% passive, but it's close. The bot I use and recommend is "The BingR", made by a reddit user whose name escapes me, but it's an excellent bot that acts very human-like and even automates the daily bonus activities and mobile searches.
Swagbucks I also also use the SBTV app and do the auto-running Swagbucks Activities on a second computer or browser (with Chrome, you can run the activity and then minimize out of the browser and it will still run; this doesn't seem to work with Firefox). If you don't know about Swagbucks, also check out the Sticky. This is also not 100% passive, but it pays pretty well. The auto-run activities have a white circle with a blue arrow and play button in the lower left-hand corner of the picture. These will run on their own and require no input beyond clicking. If you can't get them to run while minimized, you'll need to keep the window open with your mouse in the active part of the screen.
I'm always looking for new passive income streams; the less work, the better! If you're going to recommend a surfbar, it can't require any attention checks and preferably it should run in-browser and not on top of windows like some require.
submitted by darkwulfv to beermoney [link] [comments]

New International Sites - Cash Out To Paypal Starting at 0.10 Cent - One Site Even Cashes Out To Bitcoin at 0.10!

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About Superpayme Very similar to InstaGc in regards to how many offers they have. Superpayme is a GPT site which pays rates is better than many other sites. I was skeptical at first heard about this site about a year ago. But Superpayme has not disappointed.
SUPERPAYME Referral (You will get $0.20 just for signing up with my link)
SUPERPAYME Non Referral
submitted by 86nightcrawler to beermoneyuk [link] [comments]

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