How To Install Bitcoin Core on Ubuntu – Linux Hint

[IDEA] [PROPOSAL] Monero Debian (deb) packages / Debian package repository deb.getmonero.org (I can do)

I have the skills to implement this if wanted.
Possible User Experience
This is a proposal, i.e. not implemented yet. Instructions for users, simplified.
How to install monero using apt-get
Download the repository signing key.
wget https://www.getmonero.org/monero.asc
Add the signing key.
sudo apt-key --keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/monero.gpg add ~/monero.asc
Add APT repository.
echo "deb https://deb.getmonero.org buster main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/monero.list
Update your package lists.
sudo apt-get update
Install monero.
sudo apt-get install monero
A few technical implementation details
I would simply grab the binaries provided by getmonero.org, download them, check software (gpg) signatures, put these into deb packages, add these to a repository, and upload the repository.
What I would not do is creating the binaries during package creation. While this is nice to have, it doesn't help user experience and blocks the progress on reaching this goal. See next chapter.
Why simply put the pre-build Monero binaries into a deb package?
1) After bitcoin existing for more than 10 years, being popular and being in Debian unstable (sid) it still never made its way into Debian testing, let alone stable. Reason being explained that a difference in underlying libraries (even just security fixes) during compilation may result in a network split. Binaries compiled during packaging on different versions of Linux distributions might have different libraries that might cause a network fork / chain split.
References:
(Note: above website saying Tags: fixed-upstream is probably a mistake as discussion at bottom says.)
2) The github issue of packaging monero stalled.
3) By shipping the same binaries as provided by getmonero.org reduces the chances of introducing a backdoor.
Many Options
Timeline
Doable quickly. The electrum (bitcoin) AppImage was recently added to a Debian package (binaries-freedom) by me and is now easily installable in Whonix. Pre-installed in testers version of Whonix already.
About Me
I am the founder of Whonix, which I am maintaining at present for more than 7 years.
Whonix (formerly TorBOX) is a Debian GNU/Linux–based security-focused Linux distribution. It aims to provide privacy, security and anonymity on the internet.
You can see an overview of packages I am maintaining on my github profile.
To proof that this forum account adrelanos corresponds the same person maintaining whonix.org, it is added here.
Questions
What happened to, what is the successor of the forum funding system?
submitted by adrelanos to Monero [link] [comments]

Bitcoin stuck on broken wallet

I keep my bitcoin on a wallet on my Linux partition; recently, it failed to synchronize. I've tried sending a small test transaction to a wallet I have on my Windows partition; but the transaction never arrived.
Is there any way to access my bitcoin from my Windows wallet, without needing to send it over in the form of a transaction?
submitted by ElenTheMellon to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Dogecoin on Linux - The Complete Beginner's Guide

I'm writing this because I couldn't find a single condensed guide on compiling the wallet and running mining software on linux, specficially Ubuntu/Linux Mint. I combed Bitcoin and Litecoin forums for similar problems I was running into and eventually got everything nailed down, so here it is in one place, for new Shibes.
If you want to make a Dogecoin directory in your downloads folder to keep things organized, you will need to modify these commands to refelct the change. So instead of going to ~/Downloads/ you will need to go to ~/Downloads/Dogecoin and be sure to put the zipped files there when you download them, but the commands will be the same otherwise.
cwayne18 put in the work to make a PPA for the QT client here.
Ubunutu/Mint/Debian users should be able to install the client with the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cwayne18/doge sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dogecoin-qt 
To update using this method, run
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade dogecoin-qt 
Compiling the Wallet Manually
I suggest using the PPA above, but if you want to compile manually, here you go.
1)Download the newest source from here. If you want to check out the Github page, click here
2)Unzip the package with the native client OR, navigate to your downloads and unzip
cd ~/Downloads unzip dogecoin-master.zip 
3)Now it's time to compile. You will need to install the dependencies, just copy and paste the following code. It will be a fairly large download and could take some time. It is always important to update before installing any new software, so we'll do that first and then install the dependencies.
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install libssl-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev libqrencode-dev qt4-qmake libqtgui4 libqt4-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev libminiupnpc8 libboost-all-dev build-essential git libboost1.53-all-dev 
4)Once that is done, go to the doge-coin master directory and compile:
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste sed -i 's/-mgw46-mt-sd-1_53//g' dogecoin-qt.pro qmake USE_UPNP=- USE_QRCODE=0 USE_IPV6=0 make -j3 
After running the qmake command you will likely see some text similar to
Project MESSAGE: Building without UPNP support Project MESSAGE: Building with UPNP supportRemoved plural forms as the target language has less forms. If this sounds wrong, possibly the target language is not set or recognized. 
It's perfectly normal, so don't worry about that.
Your Dogewallet is ready to go! The executable is in ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste and called dogecoin-qt. Your wallet information is in ~/.dogecoin. You can run the wallet at any time by opening terminal and typing
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste ./dogecoin-qt 
Future upgrades to dogewallet are easy. Back up your wallet.dat, and simply follow the same directions above, but you'll be unzipping and building the newer version. You will likely need to rename the old dogecoin-master directory in ~/Downloads before unzipping the newest version and building. Also, it is likely that you will not need to install the dependencies again.
Alternate Method For Installing Dogecoin Wallet from Nicebreakfast
After installing the dependencies listed in step 3, open terminal, then navigate to where you want Dogecoin Wallet stored and run:
git clone https://github.com/dogecoin/dogecoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make 
then when the wallet is updated just run
git pull 
from the dogecoin directory.
GPU Mining
GPU mining requires CGminer. My suggestion is to get the executable already built. The creator of cgminer has removed the built file from his website, but I've uploaded it here
sudo apt-get install pkg-config opencl-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev autoconf libtool automake m4 ncurses-dev cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built.tar.bz2 
Don't use anything newer than 3.7.2. The newer versions of CGMiner don't support GPU mining.
That's it! You have cgminer ready to go! You will run cgminer with the following syntax
cd ~/Downloads/cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built/ ./cgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://SERVERNAME:PORT -u WORKER.ID -p PASS 
A good guide for fine tuning cgminer can be found here; follow the litecoin example.
EDIT
I had trouble getting cgminer running with a single line command, but running it via an executable .sh file works. This is covered in the cgminer setup guide I posted above but I'll put it here too. In the same directory that has the cgminer executable, you need to make a file called cgminer.sh and make it executable. It should contain the follwing:
export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export DISPLAY=:0 find *.bin -delete sleep 5 ./cgminer 
Then you can call cgminer in terminal by doing ./cgminer.sh You will need a cgminer.conf file containing all your options. All of this is covered in the guide that is linked above.
A quick note about AMD drivers: They used to be a huge PITA to install and get working, but the newest Catalyst drivers are great. There's a GUI installer, everything works out of the box, and there is a lot of documentation. You can download them here: AMD Catalyst 14.6 Beta Linux
CPU Mining
For CPU mining I use minerd because it doesn't require any work to get running, simply download it and get to work. Download the built file for your machine 32-bit or 64-bit, and then unzip it and you're ready to go!
cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf pooler-cpuminer-2.3.2-linux-x86.tar.gz 
The executable is called minerd and it will be in ~/Downloads but you can move it to wherever you like. To run it, pull up terminal and do
cd ~/Downloads minerd --url=stratum+tcp://SERVER:PORT --userpass=USERNAME.WORKERNAME:WORKERPASSWORD 
You're done! Happy mining!
Common Issues
I ran into this and I've seen others with this problem as well. Everything installs fine but there is a shared library file that isn't where it should be. In fact, it isn't there at all.
 libudev.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory 
In terminal, do
sudo updatedb locate libudev.so.0.13.0 
And it will probably return a path /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu. Inside that directory there's a library file called libudev.so.0.13.0. You'll need to make a symlink (aka shortcut) that links libudev.so.1 to libudev.so.0.13.0 So, assuming you're working with libudev.so.0.13.0 do this
cd /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu sudo ln -s libudev.so.0.13.0 libudev.so.1 
Now if you do
ln -l 
You should see
libudev.so.1 -> ./libudev.so.0.13.0 
Meaning you've made the symlink. Also, the text for libudev.so.1 will be blue.
submitted by Boozybrain to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Basic Bitcoin security guide

Hello,
This post is to give you a quick introduction into Bitcoin security. While nobody can guarantee you 100% security, I hope to mitigate some problems you can run into. This is the “20% of effort to get you to 80% safe”.
First of all, you have to determine how much money you want to hold in Bitcoin and how much effort are you willing to put in. If you are happy just holding a few dollars worth and don’t care if you lose them, that’s one approach to take. For everyone else, lets get started.
Password strength
A lot of the times how secure your money is will be determined by the strength of your password. Since in the worst case scenario we are talking about someone trying to brute force your wallet, casual online passwords are too weak. Under 10 characters is too weak. Common words and phrases are too weak. Adding one number to a password at the end is too weak.
Moreover, you can consider your password much weaker if you:
If you want a really strong password:
Wallet security
Now we are getting to the meat of things.
There are a number of wallets available to store your hard earned bitcoins. If you have a decent amount of coins to store, you should look into software wallets - BitcoinQT, MultiBit, Armory or Electrum. They are among the best place to store your money safely (provided your computer is secure as well). Chose one you think best suits you, install it and encrypt your wallet file with your strong password. You should take your wallet file and back it up (location of the file is different for different clients, so you have to do some research as to where to find that file). Back it up on a CD, safe USB drive or the like. Keep them safe. If you lose that file, you will lose your money.
A quick word on deterministic wallets. Electrum and Armory allow you to create wallets from a seed. If you use the same seed later, you can recreate your wallet on other machines. With deterministic wallets, you only need to keep that seed secure to have access to your money.
In comparison, in BitcoinQT's traditional wallet, every address you use is random, meaning that after you send 50-100 outgoing transactions your backups can be obsolete. Always keep an up-to-date backup of such wallet file if possible.
Okay, sometimes you need to have your Bitcoins with you when you leave your computer. In this case, you should look into either online or mobile wallets. A staple for both of those is Blockchain.info, but there are others to chose from.
A good rule of thumb with these is to not store more money in them than you can afford to lose. They are best used as a convenient way of accessing some money, not storing your savings. Online wallets are especially vulnerable to their servers getting hacked and people’s money getting stolen.
What to keep in mind while using online wallets:
  • Use a secure password (the more money you have in them the stronger the password should be)
  • Always keep a backup of your wallet in case you need to recover your money
  • Whenever possible, enable two factor authentication
  • Don’t use your online wallets from unsafe computers
Cold storage
Sometimes you want to store your bitcoins for a long time in a safe place. This is called “cold storage”. There are a few ways one can do this.
First of all, paper wallets. They are nice for giving people small bitcoin gifts, but also for long-term storage if properly used. What you want to do is generate and print them offline. You can save the linked page for example and run that offline. If you are really paranoid, you can put it on read-only media and access that from a different computer. For really long term storage, use archival-grade paper.
Another approach to take is using a separate computer for storing your money that is offline 99+% of the time. You could set one up easily by buying an old laptop, reformatting it, installing Linux and a Bitcoin client. Generate an address on that machine and send money to it from your main wallet. Depending on how paranoid you are you can connect that computer to the Internet afterwards to synchronize data with the Bitcoin Network and then turn it off and put it away somewhere safe until it’s needed.
Brain wallets
Don’t. They are not for you. Unless you are a security-conscientious programmer, those are not for you.
Diversifying
Keeping all of your eggs in one basket is never a good thing. You should look into diversifying some of your Bitcoin assets in case your other storage methods fail. Some ways you can diversify:
  • Buy a physical Bitcoin. As long as you trust the coin creator such coins can be an effective cold storage
  • Invest - I wouldn’t recommend this for more than some trivial amount unless you know what you are doing, but investing in some Bitcoin stocks could be a way to get more money out of your bitcoins
How not to diversify:
  • Avoid keeping your bitcoins at exchanges or other online sites that are not your online wallets. Such sites can be closed down or disappear along with your money.
  • Alt-coins - there are few cryptocurrencies that are worthwhile, but most of them are just Bitcoin clones. If a currency brings nothing new, it’s worthless in comparison to Bitcoin. Namecoin is a distributed domain name server (although recently it had a fatal flaw uncovered, so be warned), Ripple is a distributed currency exchange and payment system. Litecoin will only be useful in case Bitcoin’s hashing algorithm gets compromised (very unlikely at this time). Beyond that there are few if any alt-coins that are a worthwhile way of diversifying.
Accepting payments and safety
We’ve covered safe ways to store money, now a quick note about bitcoin payments and their safety.
First of all, when you are sending a transaction, pay your fees. Transactions without fees can take forever to propagate, confirm and clear. This can cause you a lot of stress, so pay your fees.
Secondly, when accepting large Bitcoin payments (say you want to suddenly cash in a gold bar into bitcoins), wait for at the very least 1 confirmation on those transactions. 6 is best, but having even 1 confirmations is a lot better than having none. This is mainly a rule of thumb for the paranoid (I wouldn’t be doing this for most casual transaction), but maybe it will save you if you are dealing with some shady people.
Wrapping up...
That should cover the basics. If you want to read more about Bitcoin’s security in general, here is my master thesis on the subject. A lot of questions about Bitcoin and security have also been answered on Bitcoin StackExchange - be sure to check it out.
Comments and improvement suggestions welcome.
EDITS:
  • Removed link to insecure site
  • Removed random article section
  • Added information about deterministic wallets
submitted by ThePiachu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to Mine BiblePay on Linux

This guide is outdated, please refer to:
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup
https://wiki.biblepay.org/PODC_Setup
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPORTANT - Evolution Upgrade:
Quick Start https://wiki.biblepay.org/Quick_Start
Evolution Upgrade Information https://wiki.biblepay.org/Evolution_Upgrade
Getting Started with Evolution https://wiki.biblepay.org/Getting_Started_with_Evolution
Generic Smart Contracts https://wiki.biblepay.org/Generic_Smart_Contracts
What is BiblePay Evolution? https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/bifvpk/biblepay_evolution_what_is_it/
Recommend 2GB RAM or can get stuck compiling (if 1GB RAM can use Swap File) Use Ubuntu 16.04
INFO
https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/masteBuildBiblePay.txt
INSTALL COMMANDS
apt-get install build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config libssl-dev libevent-dev bsdmainutils apt-get install libboost-system-dev libboost-filesystem-dev libboost-chrono-dev libboost-program-options-dev libboost-test-dev libboost-thread-dev apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler apt-get install git apt-get install curl build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config python3 bsdmainutils cmake sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libdb4.8-dev libdb4.8++-dev git clone http://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution prefix=x86_64-pc-linux-gnu cd biblepay-evolution/depends make -j4 # Choose a good -j value, depending on the number of CPU cores available cd .. ./autogen.sh #Note: if echo `pwd` does not return your working directory, replace it with your working directory such as /biblepay-evolution/ ./configure --prefix `pwd`/depends/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu make # See more here: #https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/mastedoc/build-unix.md 

SWAP FILE
NOTE: if server is 1GB RAM, before running last command "sudo make", set up a swap file
free #check if swap is 0 dd if=/dev/zero of=/vaswap.img bs=1024k count=1000 mkswap /vaswap.img swapon /vaswap.img free #check if swap is 1024 sudo make 

RUN COMMAND LINE
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon 
OR
RUN GUI
Your GUI program will be located in: /biblepay-evolution/src/qt
./biblepay-qt 
You can also run it in the background (to free up your terminal) if you call it with:
./biblepay-qt & 
To start mining, instructions are the same as for Windows: Go to Tools -> Debug Console
Execute this command (to start mining with 8 threads)
setgenerate true 8 
From there you can use all other commands such as getmininginfo, getwalletinfo, etc. Execute help command to get the list of all available commands.
Note: GUI will be built automatically only if you meet the requirements for qt library, i.e. make sure you ran this line before compiling:
sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler 
BIBLEPAY is now Running!

SETUP CONFIG
Stop BiblePay and set up the config file to get starting nodes to sync with and enable mining:
./biblepay-cli stop cd ~/.biblepayevolution/ vi biblepay.conf addnode=node.biblepay.org gen=1 genproclimit=1 
Escape Key + : (Colon Key) + w + q + Enter (saves file and quits)

addnode --- adds a node to the list of nodes to connect to gen=1 --- turns on mining genproclimit --- sets number of threads to use when mining

Run BiblePay again and fully sync with network
cd ../biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo 

USEFUL COMMANDS
./biblepay-cli help ./biblepay-cli getaccountaddress "" ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 ./biblepay-cli sendtoaddress "insertAddressHere" 777 "" "" true ./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon top #CPU usage q to quit 

MINING THREADS: To change number of threads to use up for mining
a. Edit home/yourusername/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file:
genproclimit=X 
and restart BiblePay -or- b. Menu >> Tools >> Debug Console >> Type command:
setgenerate true X 
(Replace X with number of threads Use top command to view CPU usage)

POOL
NOTE: To use the pool you must now use the external miner, not the wallet miner https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-nomp-pool-mining.html
  1. Set up an account on pool website: https://pool.biblepay.org/
  2. Create Worker Username(s) - Workers tab >>> Add
  3. Enable pool and add Worker Username in ~/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file, add these lines and save:
    pool=https://pool.biblepay.org workerid=insertWorkerUsernameHere
4. Restart BiblePay
./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon 
Setup Auto-Withdraw Navigate to Account >>> Account Settings >>> Verify your BBP Receiving Address >>> Click Authorize-Auto-Withdraws

UPDATE:

### Turn off/stop BiblePay
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepay-cli stop 

### Pull down latest Biblepay code and build it
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution git pull origin master sudo make 

### Turn BiblePay back on and check version number
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 

UPDATE IN ONE COMMAND:
./biblepay-evolution/src/biblepay-cli stop ; cd && cd biblepay-evolution/ && git pull origin master && sudo make && cd src && ./biblepayd -daemon && sleep 90 && ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo 
Note: the ";" says do this after, regardless of the outcome Note: && says do this after only if previous command finished with no errors

SPEED UP COMPILE:
To speed up the compile time, add -j4 or -j8 after make. This way it compiles using 4 or 8 threads instead of just 1.
./configure LDFLAGS="-L${BDB_PREFIX}/lib/" CPPFLAGS="-I${BDB_PREFIX}/include/" sudo make -j8 
Reference: http://www.linux-databook.info/?page_id=2319

RSYNC stop biblepay from your nodes compile on your fastest machine then rsync with your machines only src folder is required
rsync -avuz /root/biblepay-evolution/src/ [email protected]:/root/biblepay-evolution/src/ 
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3299951/how-to-pass-password-for-rsync-ssh-command https://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/11/3-steps-to-perform-ssh-login-without-password-using-ssh-keygen-ssh-copy-id/
people make cron jobs and rsync automatically

OUTDATED

Unofficial Bash Script
https://gist.github.com/anonymous/d1c1d35e3c8f67f5fb2e204479fa5c6b

Official Ubuntu Package
https://launchpad.net/~biblepay-official

Unofficial Ubuntu Package
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7rwqqs/unofficial_ubuntu_packages_available/

Unofficial Mine in One Line
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7ryuk1/mine_in_one_line/
NOTE: DONT RUN ON A COMPUTER WITH COINS -- THIS IS A CLEAN INSTALL SCRIPT

COMPILE WITHOUT GUI: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878317#msg21878317 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878389#msg21878389
ADVANCED:

DOCKER IMAGES (NOTE: I havent tested these, use at your own risk) https://hub.docker.com/gagaha/biblepay/ https://hub.docker.com/cryptozero/biblepay-opt/
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

Secure paper wallet tutorial

This is my handout for paranoid people who want a way to store bitcoin safely. It requires a little work, but this is the method I use because it should be resistant to risks associated with:
  1. Bad random number generators
  2. Malicious or flawed software
  3. Hacked computers
If you want a method that is less secure but easier, skip to the bottom of this post.
The Secure Method
  1. Download bitaddress.org. (Try going to the website and pressing "ctrl+s")
  2. Put the bitaddress.org file on a computer with an operating system that has not interacted with the internet much or at all. The computer should not be hooked up to the internet when you do this. You could put the bitaddress file on a USB stick, and then turn off your computer, unplug the internet, and boot it up using a boot-from-CD copy of linux (Ubuntu or Mint for example). This prevents any mal-ware you may have accumulated from running and capturing your keystrokes. I use an old android smart phone that I have done a factory reset on. It has no sim-card and does not have the password to my home wifi. Also the phone wifi is turned off. If you are using a fresh operating system, and do not have a connection to the internet, then your private key will probably not escape the computer.
  3. Roll a die 62 times and write down the sequence of numbers. This gives you 2160 possible outcomes, which is the maximum that Bitcoin supports.
  4. Run bitaddress.org from your offline computer. Input the sequence of numbers from the die rolls into the "Brain Wallet" tab. By providing your own source of randomness, you do not have to worry that the random number generator used by your computer is too weak. I'm looking at you, NSA ಠ_ಠ
  5. Brain Wallet tab creates a private key and address.
  6. Write down the address and private key by hand or print them on a dumb printer. (Dumb printer means not the one at your office with the hard drive. Maybe not the 4 in 1 printer that scans and faxes and makes waffles.) If you hand copy them you may want to hand copy more than one format. (WIF and HEX). If you are crazy and are storing your life savings in Bitcoin, and you hand copy the private key, do a double-check by typing the private key back into the tool on the "Wallet Details" tab and confirm that it recreates the same public address.
  7. Load your paper wallet by sending your bitcoin to the public address. You can do this as many times as you like.
  8. You can view the current balance of your paper wallet by typing the public address into the search box at blockchain.info
  9. If you are using an old cell phone or tablet do a factory reset when you are finished so that the memory of the private keys is destroyed. If you are using a computer with a boot-from-CD copy of linux, I think you can just power down the computer and the private keys will be gone. (Maybe someone can confirm for me that the private keys would not be able to be cached by bitaddress?)
  10. To spend your paper wallet, you will need to either create an offline transaction, or import the private key into a hot wallet. Creating an offline transaction is dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. Importing to a client side wallet like Bitcoin-Qt, Electrum, MultiBit or Armory is a good idea. You can also import to an online wallet such as Blockchain.info or Coinbase.
Trusting bitaddress.org
The only thing you need bitaddress.org to do is to honestly convert the brainwallet passphrase into the corresponding private key and address. You can verify that it is doing this honestly by running several test passphrases through the copy of bitaddress that you plan on using, and several other brainwallet generators. For example, you could use the online version of bitaddress, and brainwallet and safepaperwallet and bitcoinpaperwallet. If you are fancy with the linux command line, you can also try "echo -n my_die_rolls | sha256sum". The linux operating system should reply with the same private key that bitaddress makes. This protects you from a malicious paper wallet generator.
Trusting your copy of bitaddress.org
Bitaddress publishes the sha1 hash of the bitaddress.org website at this location:
https://www.bitaddress.org/pgpsignedmsg.txt
The message is signed by the creator, pointbiz. I found his PGP fingerprint here:
https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org/issues/18
"527B 5C82 B1F6 B2DB 72A0 ECBF 8749 7B91 6397 4F5A"
With this fingerprint, you can authenticate the signed message, which gives you the hash of the current bitaddress.org file. Then you can hash your copy of the file and authenticate the file.
I do not have a way to authenticate the fingerprint itself, sorry. According to the website I linked to, git has cryptographic traceability that would enable a person to do some research and authenticate the fingerprint. If you want to go that far, knock yourself out. I think that the techniques described in this document do not really rely on bitaddress being un-corrupt. Anyway, how do we know pointbiz is a good guy? ;-)
There are a lot of skilled eyes watching bitaddress.org and the signed sha1 hash. To gain the most benefit from all of those eyes, it's probably worthwhile to check your copy by hashing it and comparing to the published hash.
"But we aren't supposed to use brainwallets"
You are not supposed to use brainwallets that have predictable passphrases. People think they are pretty clever about how they pick their passphrases, but a lot of bitcoins have been stolen because people tend to come up with similar ideas. If you let dice generate the passphrase, then it is totally random, and you just need to make sure to roll enough times.
How to avoid spending your life rolling dice
When I first started doing this, I rolled a die 62 times for each private key. This is not necessary. You can simply roll the die 62 times and keep the sequence of 62 numbers as a "seed". The first paper address you create would use "my die rolls-1" as the passphrase, the second would be "my die rolls-2" and so on. This is safe because SHA256 prevents any computable relationship between the resulting private key family.
Of course this has a certain bad security scenario -- if anyone obtains the seed they can reconstruct all of your paper wallets. So this is not for everyone! On the other hand, it also means that if you happen to lose one of your paper wallets, you could reconstruct it so long as you still had the seed.
One way to reduce this risk is to add an easy to remember password like this: "my die rolls-password-1".
If you prefer, you can use a technique called diceware to convert your die rolls to words that still contain the same quantity of entropy, but which could be easier to work with. I don't use diceware because it's another piece of software that I have to trust, and I'm just copy/pasting my high entropy seed, so I don't care about how ugly it is.
Why not input the dice as a Base 6 private key on the Wallet Details tab?
Two reasons. First of all, this option requires that you roll the die 99 times, but you do not get meaningful additional protection by rolling more than 62 times. Why roll more times if you don't have to? Second, I use the "high entropy seed" method to generate multiple private keys from the same die rolls. Using the Base 6 option would require rolling 99 times for every private key.
I'm a big nerd with exotic dice. How many times to roll?
Put this formula in Excel to get the number of times to roll: "=160*LOG(2,f)" where f = number of faces on the die. For example, you would roll a d16 40 times. By the way, somewhat unbelievably casino dice are more fair than ordinary dice
The "Change address" problem:
You should understand change addresses because some people have accidentally lost money by not understanding it.
Imagine your paper wallet is a 10 dollar bill. You use it to buy a candy bar. To do this you give the cashier the entire 10 dollar bill. They keep 1 dollar and give you 9 dollars back as change.
With Bitcoin, you have to explicitly say that you want 9 dollars back, and you have to provide an address where it should go to. If you just hand over the 10 dollar bill, and don't say you want 9 dollars back, then the miner who processes the transaction gives 1 dollar to the store and keeps the remainder themselves.
Wallet software like Bitcoin-Qt handles this automatically for you. They automatically make "change addresses" and they automatically construct transactions that make the change go to the change address.
There are three ways I know of that the change problem can bite you:
  1. You generate a raw transaction by hand, and screw up. If you are generating a transaction "by hand" with a raw transaction editor, you need to be extra careful that your outputs add up to the same number as your inputs. Otherwise, the very lucky miner who puts your transaction in a block will keep the difference.
  2. You import a paper wallet into a wallet software and spend part of it, and then think that the change is in the paper wallet. The change is not in the paper wallet. It is in a change address that the wallet software generated. That means that if you lose your wallet.dat file you will lose all the change. The paper wallet is empty.
  3. You import a paper wallet into a wallet software and spend part of it, and then think that the change is in the change address that the wallet software generated. If the transaction did not need to consume all of the "outputs" used to fund the paper wallet, then there could be some unspent outputs still located at the address of the paper wallet. If you destroyed the paper wallet, and destroyed the copy of the private key imported to the wallet software, then you could not access this money. (E.g. if you restored the software wallet from its seed, thinking all of the money was moved to the wallet-generated change addresses.)
For more on this, see here
The hot paper wallet problem
Your bitcoin in your paper wallet are secure, so long as the piece of paper is secure, until you go to spend it. When you spend it, you put the private key onto a computer that is connected to the internet. At this point you must regard your paper wallet address as hot because the computer you used may have been compromised. It now provides much less protection against theft of your coins. If you need the level of protection that a cold paper wallet provides, you need to create a new one and send your coins to it.
Destroying your paper wallet address
Do not destroy the only copy of a private key without verifying that there is no money at that address. Your client may have sent change to your paper wallet address without you realizing it. Your client may have not consumed all of the unspent outputs available at the paper wallet address. You can go to blockchain.info and type the public address into the search window to see the current balance. I don't bother destroying my used/empty paper wallet addresses. I just file them away.
Encrypting your private key
BIP 0038 describes a standardized way to encrypt your paper wallet private key. A normal paper wallet is vulnerable because if anyone sees the private key they can take the coins. The BIP38 protocol is even resistant to brute force attacks because it uses a memory intensive encryption algorithm called scrypt. If you want to encrypt your wallets using BIP38, I recommend that you use bitcoinpaperwallet because they will let you type in your own private key and will encrypt it for you. As with bitaddress, for high security you should only use a local copy of this website on a computer that will never get connected to the internet.
Splitting your private key
Another option for protecting the private key is to convert it into multiple fragments that must be brought together. This method allows you to store pieces of your key with separate people in separate locations. It can be set up so that you can reconstitute the private key when you have any 2 out of the 3 fragments. This technique is called Shamir's Secret Sharing. I have not tried this technique, but you may find it valuable. You could try using this website http://passguardian.com/ which will help you split up a key. As before, you should do this on an offline computer. Keep in mind if you use this service that you are trusting it to work properly. It would be good to find other independently created tools that could be used to validate the operation of passguardian. Personally, I would be nervous destroying the only copy of a private key and relying entirely on the fragments generated by the website.
Looks like Bitaddress has an implementation of Shamir's Secret Sharing now under the "Split Wallet" tab. However it would appear that you cannot provide your own key for this, so you would have to trust bitaddress.
Durable Media
Pay attention to the media you use to record your paper wallet. Some kinds of ink fade, some kinds of paper disintegrate. Moisture and heat are your enemies.
In addition to keeping copies of my paper wallet addresses I did the following:
  1. Order a set of numeric metal stamps. ($10)
  2. Buy a square galvanized steel outlet cover from the hardware store ($1)
  3. Buy a sledgehammer from the hardware store
  4. Write the die rolls on the steel plate using a sharpie
  5. Use the hammer to stamp the metal. Do all the 1's, then all the 2's etc. Please use eye protection, as metal stamp may emit sparks or fly unexpectedly across the garage. :-)
  6. Use nail polish remover to erase the sharpie
Electrum
If you trust electrum you might try running it on an offline computer, and having it generate a series of private keys from a seed. I don't have experience with this software, but it sounds like there are some slick possibilities there that could save you time if you are working with a lot of addresses.
Message to the downvoters
I would appreciate it if you would comment, so that I can learn from your opinion. Thanks!
The Easy Method
This method is probably suitable for small quantities of bitcoin. I would not trust it for life-altering sums of money.
  1. Download the bitaddress.org website to your hard drive.
  2. Close your browser
  3. Disconnect from the internet
  4. Open the bitaddress.org website from your hard drive.
  5. Print a paper wallet on your printer
  6. Close your browser
submitted by moral_agent to BitcoinWallet [link] [comments]

A guide to sign a super bitcoin (SBTC) transaction offline with patched Electrum for paranoid. Supports any wallets supported by Electrum (including segwit-p2sh and bech32 and all BIP39 seeds). Later BCD will be added.

This is quite advanced. This guide assumes you have some basic experience with the command line, can run Linux and you understand the basics of keys/signing/broadcasting transactions. And that you can compile and run Bitcoin Core and run Electrum. Also, some JSON experience is also nice.
Move you bitcoins to safe addresses first. It is best to use a new seed. Although the procedure in this guide is safe even for hot addresses (containing bitcoins), there is always a risk of a critical mistake. So play it safe.
Why such a guide? I followed these steps because I did not want to expose the keys to any online machine at all. Even if the keys do not have any bitcoins, you can some day have bitcoins sent to these addresses or you have a fork that you have not claimed. All can be stolen if you exposed your key.
This procedure should work with everything that Electrum supports (except maybe F2A that may be not supported on the SBTC chain), so Electrum seed legacy or segwit, LedgeTrezor with legacy or segiwt-p2sh (m/'49) derivation. Similarly, any BIP39 seeds or a single key. are also fine.
  1. Download Electrum. git clone https://github.com/spesmilo/electrum
  2. Apply my patch patch -P0 also this article. The guide assumes that you use patched Electrum from now on.
  3. Run the patched Electrum and catch up with your wallets you want to claim (the wallets can and rather should be watch only, or on ledgetrezor, otherwise your keys are exposed). Now go offline or set localhost as your server that Electrum connects to so no connection is performed. It's required so Electrum will not update the wallet after you edit it.
  4. You can manually create a transaction from the command line but you can use Electrum GUI. You need to locate the wallet file and remove all the transactions from the wallet file except for the one that funds the address you want to claim (the wallet obviously must not be encrypted but for watch-only this is OK). This is tricky. You need to make sure, you gave a proper JSON file, so all the final commas must be dropped. So "addr_history":, "transactions": , "tx_fees":, "txi", "txo", and "verified_tx3": should only contain the funding transaction(s), i.e. the one that you want to spend from.
  5. Run Electrum and check if the wallet is OK. Electrum will show an error if not. You will probably make a few errors so go back to editing the wallet.
  6. Download SBTC bitcoin core clone. git clone https://github.com/superbitcoin/SuperBitcoin
  7. Compile it and let it sync the blockchain (it will take a long time). Run it it with as large -dbcache= as you can. If you have a Bitcoin blockchain you can copy the blocks up to the fork date and issue sbtcd with -reindex. It will just reindex them and it will be faster.
  8. Generate a sbtc address with sbtc-cli getnewaddress. You can skip this step and send directly to an exchange but this intermediate step is safer.
  9. Create a transaction in Electrum to this address. Select all the bitcoins and use as small fee as possible (SBTC blocks are empty so any fee above 1 SBTCsat/byte should be OK).
  10. Save the transaction to a pendrive
  11. Download and install Kubuntu 16.04 (Kubuntu has all the QT libraries for Electrum) on a pen drive.
  12. Copy patched Electrum and the save the transaction to a pen drive (separate from Kubuntu will be more convenient).
  13. Run Kubuntu from the USB without any network access. Run Electrum from the pendrive. Create a wallet from the seed or private keys. The wallets are stored in RAM so after you reboot the computer, they will be gone. Load the transaction, sign it and save it to the pen drive.
  14. Go back to the SBTC Core on the online machine. Display the raw transaction (starts with the hex=). Check in the SBTC Core if it is correct sbtc-cli decoderawtransaction hex
  15. If it looks fine (and your blockchain got synced), broadcast it sbtc-cli sendrawtransaction hex
If there is no error, congratulations, you sent the transaction to the specified address. If it is to your SBTC Core wallet, wait until it confirms and send it further with sbtc-cli setfee feeperkb sbtc-cli sendtoaddress "addr" value "" "" true true
I'm going to update this guide when I figure out the BCD transactions intrinsics. You can download and run the BitcoinDiamond Core clone in the meantime.
SBTC tips: 1KjuY8CTrwMhdLt3uF3hCcSgfkHMyo1ELf
submitted by PVmining to BitcoinAirdrops [link] [comments]

Let's Decentralise the World and Make World Crypto Network a Distributed Autonomous Organisation

Decentralise the World

EDIT 2014-08-01 See also pierebel0 Seed the Chain
Please read this carefully and be forthcoming with your views. It’s important to the future of World Crypto Network.
As many of you may know pierebel0 (Nick) and I have been working on an idea and since then we have been putting together diagrams and a plan.
Basically we want to get open source software to regions of the world that have poor internet connectivity and are in need of most financial innovation. This would be like an airdrop of items including:
Nick's initial idea was to produce a list of villages and towns ranked by bandwidth and we would then give each place a Bitcoin donation address.
We could use a map of the world using the open source CoinMap. A page on the World Crypto Net website called Join the Revolution. Members of the audience, hosts of the show and any willing participants in the global campaign can sign up and put themselves on the map.
We could then setup a Bitcoin Wallet in Armory and assign a Bitcoin address for every viable village and town in the world.
Our audience will be invited to vote on which town or village they wanted as to do an Open Source Airdrop on by sending bitcoins to that address. Each donation would be like a vote. We would set targets on each location based on the most cost effective way of delivering it and then let the market decide what order we should go in. We would probably want to weight it to regions that had the most potential to benefit from the project.

World Crypto Network as a DAO (Distributed Autonomous Organisation)

Now the next question that came up is how to handle the funds responsibly?
Up until now people have just trusted Thom and I and sent us money. But if we are going to practice what we preach in this brave new community then what better opportunity to try out a DAO. Recently I reinstalled Bitcoin Armory to try out the new Multisig and multipart paper backup features and I suggest the following process for discussion:
  1. Live Town Hall meeting on Youtube with plenty of advance warning with members of our audience who have followed us up until now to discuss the election process of 7 people who will be custodians of Bitcoin Armory Wallet.
Key decisions will be things like: * How the election should take place? * Using the block chain as a clock on which Bitcoin Block should it commence? e.g. the election takes place at block height #312,020
Once elected each person is given a number at random.
  1. A custodian of the funds is selected at random using the first number in the Bitcoin nonce at block #312,017 between 1 and 7. This way none of the elected 7 will know if they are going to be in charge. This should filter out any power hungry psychopaths as mostly they want control right now and not leave it to chance. We want any would be dictator to self-deselect themselves from this process.
  2. That custodian then produces an Armory wallet consisting of a 5 of 7 paper backup. Each elected member is given one each and the custodian keeps the master copy. In order for the wallet to be restored and funds to be spendable you would need 5 people out of the seven to collude or join together in protest against the custodian.
Everyone, the audience and elected 7 included are encouraged to publish their raw public keys (in hex, not the normal address) so that we can create ad hoc multi-sig wallets with one another on a project by project basis.
I would also like to include the ability for the audience to become hosts and participants and even allow them to seize the funds by co-operating with members of the elected 7. This would mean dividing up 1 of the 7 root keys in to smaller junks like with a multiple encrypted zip file or something.

Thoughts and things to consider:

What I particularly like about splitting up the keys is that we could even engineer it to make sure that no more than 2 members of staff are elected per country. That way no single authority could shut down the World Crypto Network.
It’s also important to note that the elected staff and random custodian are just admin staff. Everyone’s a leader at WCN and the role of the people at the top is to give the people at the bottom everything they need to get their job done. All the custodian is doing it making sure the web hosting is paid for and that the donations get sent to the right people.
Individuals within the organisation are still responsible for their own projects and fundraising. None of the elected 7 can stop you from soliciting money for your hard work. But they might come in handy if you want to set up a project for a 3rd party like Let’s get Nepal on a Meshnet and you would like to setup a 2 of 3 multisig wallet of which one of them could be the custodian. This would lend you credibility when you market your project and make people more likely to donate.
We could also not bother with the initial election and just self appoint the first 7 people and just rotate the duties every 15,000 blocks.
Also Thornbreaker (Jamie Nelson) mentioned that we should come up with a manifesto. I think this is a good idea and we could do it on Github or a Wiki.
Thank-you for your time, I look forward to your reading thoughts.
submitted by MrChrisJ to worldcryptonetwork [link] [comments]

Trading DOGE: Your full guide to trading Dogecoin for profit

NOTE: YES! This guide is long, but when you get started it's fast and easy.
Hi everyone,
my previous post about PTC's got so much hate. So I decided to make a full guide on how I made $120 last month. If the same interest and numbers remain you'll be making $100/month for two months, and $500/month for another month. On your third month, you'll be able to make over $750 if the market remains. These last couple of days I've just bought low sold high to people. The steps are really simple and anyone can do it, I'll show you all the steps in detail for maximum profits.
Disclaimer: I am not responsible for your money or actions. Any accusations to me (Rynsi) will not be accepted, use it on your own risk!
1. Introduction
2. Get started with Dogecoin
2.1 Install your wallet
3. Choose trading sources
3.1 USD/BTC
3.2 BTC/DOGE
4. Where to sell Dogecoin?
5. Good advise
6. Summary
7. Proof of Screenshots for the naysayers
8. Links
1. Introduction
I started trading Dogecoin (I'll talk about this coin soon) 5th of February, and saw a great potential in making money with it. With this guide, you'll make 15%-30% of your money back with each trade because the current market is limited, therfor YOU can provite this service that many people request. I started with $72 and now have $220, which makes my ROI 205.5%. I will show you how it's made step by step before it blows up and become viral!
2. Get started with Dogecoin
You can use it to buy goods and services, or trade it for other currencies (both other cryptocurrencies or traditional currency like US dollars). By far the most popular use the Dogecoin however is for "tipping" fellow internet-goers who are creating or sharing great content. Think of it as a more meaningful "like" or upvote, with real value that can be used all across the internet.
2.1 Install your wallet
To start using Dogecoin, you'll need a wallet. A wallet is just like your online bank account, only your entire account is stored securely on your local computer or in the cloud. From your wallet you can send and receive Dogecoin, manage your address book and review a history of your transactions.
Desktop wallets can be downloaded and run from your computer's desktop. Desktop wallets are more secure as they don't rely on a third-party server in the cloud:
Windows (click to download)
OS X (click to download)
Source code(if you're using Linux, you'll need to compile the wallet yourself)
For Windows and OS X users, simply extract the .zip file to a secure location on your computer, then double click on "dogecoin-qt" to run. For information on how to use your desktop wallet, check out this great site.
3. Choose trading sources
You know now how to get a Dogecoin wallet, but you will need to get an online wallet to save USD on, one exchange site to trade USD to BTC and one to trade BTC to DOGE. It might sound a lot to do in the startup phase, but it's really easy once you get going!
3.1 USD/BTC Exchange
There are a lot of options when it comes to buying BTC, but for now VirWox is the only one that accepts PayPal and VISA purchases. You can choose many different kinds of sites that accept USD/BTC trades, that is another story that is another story to be told. VirWox has a limit of depositing $780 per month, but after 60 days you can deposit $2800 per month, so trading as much as possible will be the best thing to do if you want money.
USD Storage: PayPal
USD/BTC Exchange: VirWox (ref / non-ref)
To deposit dollars with (VERIFIED) PayPal to VirWox, you need to be a verified user. This is to prevent frautend actions such as chargebacks and instant payments. The deposit will be instantly made after you complete the order and you can start trade. To trade, you first have to buy SLL with the USD on your account [!!!WARNING!!!] USE LIMIT ORDER and NOT market order.
Now do the same, but with the SLL/BTC exchange. I repeat, do NOT use the market order. Use LIMIT ORDER to get as much BTC as possible.
You have now successfully completed a USD/BTC exchange!
3.2 BTC/DOGE Exchange
This step is almost similar to the previous Exchange, but this step is only with Crypto-currency (read Bitcoin and Dogecoin).
BTC/USD Exchange: Cryptsy (ref / non-ref)
To exchange to BTC, you need to withdraw your BTC from VirWox to Cryptsy. This is made in the Cryptsy balance page, where you can generate a BTC deposit adress. Unfortunately, you have to wait 48 hours the first time for VirWox to accept your deposit manually due to security reasons, all the other transactions in this guide will be almost instant.
Now when you have BTC on your Cryptsy account, you have to do the same as you did with USD/SLL and SLL/BTC, really easy! When you have traded to DOGE, your downloaded Desktop Wallet comes in handy. Deposit the DOGE from Cryptsy to your Desktop Wallet and you're ready to go to the next step!
4. Where to sell Dogecoin?
This is a great surprise I have waited to tell you, you use REDDIT to sell Dogecoin! It's really easy to do. Go to /dogemarket/new and see what the current prices are. You can sell for the same price as others, undercut for faster sales or overcut for slower sales (but bigger profits!). You structure the post by [SERVICE] AMOUNT RATE PAYMENT TYPE (SPECIAL OFFER). Here is an example, my last post where I sold Dogecoin. If you follow my conversation in that post you will see how typical trades are being made.
When you have traded the Doge you can make a post on the /dogemarket verification thread where you achieve levels that will be shown for other users through your flare. Notice the orage flares, those indicate level of trades, age and amount you have traded. These are good for noticing legit and fake users, but always be of scammers!
5. Good advise
A. Only accept GIFT (friends and family option) from (VERIFIED) PayPal, DO NOT accept eChecks or transactions that has to be accepted first. eChecks and Instant payments can be chargebacked and gifts will prevent this from being possible.
B. If you have reached VirWox deposit limit, wait a while to see how the BTC/DOGE market is going. You might make some extra 1000's of DOGE if you wait a while.
C. Always be nice and kind to the DOGE community, they are really friendly, patient and polite, be so too!
D. Try to be fast in your transactions on /dogemarket, good service equals good reviews.
E. PEOPLE WILL TRY TO SCAM YOU! Always check for names including "shibe" or "doge" and new accounts.
F. Have fun! If you have fun trading and communicating with other people on Reddit, you will enjoy yourself and have a better time making money.
6. Summary: A step by step guide to make $100+/month
(and $500+/month after 60 days if market remains)
Download your dogecoin wallet.
Sign up to PayPal, VirWox and Cryptsy.
Add money to your (VERIFIED) PayPal account.
Deposit the money to VirWox.
Exchange money to SLL.
Exchange SLL to BTC.
Withdraw BTC to Cryptsy.
Exchange BTC to DOGE.
Withdraw DOGE to Desktop Wallet.
Make a post on /dogemarket.
Recieve PayPal money from buyer.
Send Dogecoin to buyer.
7. Proof of Screenshots for the naysayers
PayPal Proof
VirWox Proof
Cryptsy Proof
Desktop Wallet Proof
As if you haven't seen the whole iceberg, here is my reddit verification post
8. Links
Dogecoin Promotional video(a must watch)
Dogecoin Subreddit
Dogecoin Official website
Bitcoin Subreddit

Bitcoin Official website

This is my first guide: making over $100/month with a $72 investment. When your VirWox account is 60 days you'll make $500/month and when your VirWox account is 90 days you'll make $750/month (if market remains as it is).
I think it's a big effort by me trying to teach you how to make money, so I would really appreciate you using the referral links. If you find any errors in my guide, please don't hesitate to tell. I will be answering any questions regarding my guide as good as possible doesn't matter if you comment or PM.
I'm accepting any donations,
DHKzSsCVpv5QuJvHxWKENH9SKC3S58raBx
Thanks.
TL;DR Wanna be rich? read.
Edit: Formatting
submitted by Rynsi to beermoney [link] [comments]

Help getting ABC node on MY Ubuntu 12 VPS?

Edit: Ubuntu 12 too old to use this repository. Upgrading to 14 fixed it!
Note that now Bitcoin Unlimited has a BCC version up at adoptanode.com its probably unnecessary to set up a BCC node on a VPS.

My hosting provider offers VPS hosting so thought I'd try it as first month is half price.
I can choose from various versions of Linux, and for the moment am on Ubuntu 12.
After some fiddling, I was able to add the PPA, but when trying to install bitcoind and bitcoin-qt I get this error :
[email protected]:~# apt-get install bitcoind bitcoin-qt
Reading package lists... 0%
Reading package lists... 100%
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree... 0%
Building dependency tree... 0%
Building dependency tree... 50%
Building dependency tree... 50%
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... 0%
Reading state information... 2%
Reading state information... Done
E: Unable to locate package bitcoin-qt
[email protected]:~#
I don't think it's reading the PPA or it's picking up another bitcoind because if I just apt-get install bitcoind then get to run it, it says it's very old and discontinued.
I am a Unix novice. And in doing this from a phone.
Trying to use instructions from https://amp.reddit.com/btc/comments/6poavx/bitcoin_abc_ubuntu_repo_has_been_updated_to_serve/
submitted by cccmikey to btc [link] [comments]

[PSA] Bitcoin 101

Just a quick guide on Bitcoins and some frequently asked questions.
Firstly, if you have absolutely no idea what Bitcoins are, I suggest you visit www.weusecoins.com for the basic concepts, terminology and general information regarding Bitcoins.
Bitcoins are a virtual / digital currency (or commodity) that can be used to pay for goods and services over the internet.

Why would we use Bitcoins over the other forms of payment?

Absolutely No Chargebacks

The main reason for me personally is that there is zero chance of chargebacks like you might get with something like PayPal. Ever sold something to a random steam account and then have PayPal side with the buyer who claims that he did not receive the goods even though you transferred the items to him? With Bitcoins, one you receive payment, there is no chance of reversing or disputing the payment. What this means is that you can now sell to buyers who have little to no reputation and be absolutely sure that you will get your money.
The caveat here, to buyers is of course to only buy from reputable sellers as once you sent your Bitcoins, there is no way to get them back (or use a trusted middleman who will hold onto the sellers item while you send payment). Bitcoins was how I sold my Golden Baby Roshan without fear of losing the money as upon receipt of the Bitcoins, I sold them to someone here (New Zealand) for local currency.

Little to no fees and no regional restrictions

Usually Bitcoin transactions do not need fees to process (and take an average of 10 minutes to confirm) though this means that it might take a while longer for your seller to confirm that he has indeed received the payment when the network gets busy (i.e. lots of transactions being sent in the network). A small fee is sometimes included so that transactions get processed quicker and that minimum fee is 0.0001 BTC or $0.015 at todays (14 Oct 2013) exchange rate. This is processed automatically in the Bitcoin wallet (software) that you use. Also there is no geographical restrictions to who can and cannot use Bitcoins so they are available all over the world where ever internet is available.

Bitcoin Wallets and Addresses

Bitcoin wallets are the software programs that you use to hold and transact Bitcoins with. Wallets are available for almost all platforms (Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and to a certain extent on iOS). Most if not all wallets are available on the official Bitcoin project page:
http://bitcoin.org/en/choose-your-wallet
Be wary of third party wallets that are hosted by websites such as www.blockchain.info and www.coinbase.com. Although they are reputable companies that make bitcoin transacting easier (you don't have to store bitcoins on your own computer and can easily use them on any other computer as they are accessible by the web browser), they essentially hold your Bitcoins for you and if their service goes down, so does your Bitcoins. The downside of using software wallets on your computer is that they take up quite a bit of space (in the case of the full client; Bitcoin-QT)and can only be accessed if you are at your computer.
A Bitcoin address looks very much like an email address, only longer and more difficult to remember:
1M72Sfpbz1BPpXFHz9m3CdqATR44Jvaydd
That long alphanumeric line above is an example of a Bitcoin address and is given to your buyer when they want to send Bitcoins to you. You can generate any number of addresses so that you do not have to use the same one for each transaction. Bitcoin wallets will hold all your addresses and make transactions easier as they usually allow for one click copying of address for you to paste somewhere else; minimizing the error of typing out such a long address. When a Bitcoin payment is sent to an address, the receiver will receive a notification that his or her address has received Bitcoins. There is then a confirmation period (10 minutes on average) for the network to confirm that Bitcoin address A has successfully sent Bitcoins to Bitcoin address B. A fully confirmed transaction has 6 confirmations though some websites make do with less confirmations.

Where to get Bitcoins?

There are plenty of ways to get Bitcoins. One of the ways to get them, is to mine them yourself though this requires some hardware and is no longer profitable to do so as you will waste more in hardware costs and electricity cost than some other players out there who know how to mine more efficiently. The next way is to simply buy them from someone near you on https://localbitcoins.com/, a website that uses your location to show the nearest Bitcoin sellers and buyers.
Some other places you can buy them are on exchanges such as www.mtgox.com or www.bitstamp.net
A list of places to buy and sell Bitcoins is available on the Bitoin wiki: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Buying_bitcoins
You can also provide services (such as web design, homework help, etc) or sell your Dota 2 items for Bitcoins :)
Now that you have read this huge wall of text, feel free to ask any questions below which I will answer and include in this main post.
If you're interested in the technical know-how of the Bitcoin protocol:
http://bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf
Bitcoins are not backed by any government or institution thus no one person can make as many bitcoins as they want.
submitted by jerye to Dota2Trade [link] [comments]

I built a crytptocurency over the break and am now more skeptical of crypto than when I started.

Over the winter break, I decided to take up the challenge of creating a cryptocurrency (based on the Litecoin codebase. Let me begin by stating that I have been very skeptical of the technology since first hearing about it many years ago. Having undergone the process of creating one now, I have hardened my skepticism even further.
Odd things like ability to premine blocks before others have a chance (which is very easy on new chains, I scored 40,000 #FTH on first day mining with a 4 year old Lenovo), hard coded nodes in the BTC and LTC source code (not exactly decentralized if you bake ip's in the source), and the left over remnants of BTC named assets in the LTC codebase (LTC began as a clone of BTC that basically replaced the PoW algorithm and changed some icons, I'm sure they did more since then tho) stood out to me as questionable.
Regardless, if people want to believe that the idea of crypto as a mainstream financial technology is feasible, then I have no issue with that. People are free to believe what they wish.
With that said, I am happy to announce the launch of the #faithcoin 🙌🙌🙌 blockchain.:
"#FTH the cryptocurrency you have to believe in"
I tried not to cut corners on this thing, it might be production ready. The daemon and wallet support Windows and Linux, and nodes can be deployed with a single docker command ("docker pull toolboc/faithcoin"). This was mostly possible to accomplish in a short timeframe because I started off by cloning the Litecoin codebase. If you are interested in what was modified to begin a new chain, you can peruse the commit history @ https://github.com/toolboc/faithcoin/commits/master
Nodes have been deployed to South Central US and West Europe with peers located in Mexico, UK, & South America.
It probably won't turn into anything, so please do not get excited about the prospect of it ever really doing anything purposeful. This was mostly a technical exercise for me personally that I have long wanted to accomplish, at the very least it could make for a fun presentation somewhere.
I plan to write an article for Hackster.io in the near future explaining exactly what I did to teach others how they can create their own cryptocurrency from the current Litecoin codebase. There are a variety of resources out there today that are either dated and/or incomplete. While those resources gave me guidance, it would be a lot easier for others if someone would just write out the whole process in a noob friendly way. The article will aim to achieve that goal. Altcoinz for all the things right?
Here's to hoping for a billion dollar valuation in the next month. I mean if it worked for Dentacoin it could totally work for a currency backed by faith right?
You can grab latest binaries and get started mining #FTH (if you actually believe in it) @ http://faithco.in/
submitted by toolboc to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Guide for first timers

I made this for my friends and family to use. Hope this heps someone. Much help!
bitcoins first: Get a wallet - just like physical money, you need a wallet to hold the money. use multibit - for a wallet - if you want options here a few http://bitcoin.org/en/choose-your-wallet go here and download this https://multibit.org/ how to backup your wallet https://multibit.org/help_backupWalletUsingPrivateKeys.html i recommend backing it up to at least 3 separate locations. example: harddrive, usb drive, encrypted dropbox folder.
go here to buy bitcoin also known as an exchange https://coinbase.com/?r=52dee75a8a2eed3e480000e5&utm_campaign=user-referral&src=referral-link
don't create wallet, click sign up button on top right. add bank information, and credit card info, and phone info - phone allows 2 factor authentication so your identity becomes much more difficult to fake and steal your money and information. I asked them to send me a SMS message instead of using app. this is the most reputable place to do this at. Never never use an online wallet!!!
buy some bitcoin on coinbase.com, and send yourself some bitcoin using your multibit wallet address(under the Request tab it shows your address there)
Now Dogecoin First get a wallet, - use the qt wallet. You can get it here for either Mac or Windows. http://dogecoin.com/ for linux use this guide - http://www.reddit.com/dogecoin/comments/1tvmnd/dogecoin_on_linux_the_complete_beginners_guide/
For a place to buy dogecoin. Use cryptsy, here is the link. https://www.cryptsy.com/users/register?refid=138894
click register new account. enter your information. go to your settings, and enable 2 factor authentication, use your cell phone number, and put in the number that they send to your phone. This makes it much more secure. you will send your bitcoins here and then buy dogecoin, then send the dogecoin to your wallet on your own computer. Backup the wallet after every purchase.
Send your Dogecoin to your own wallet. backup your wallet, at least 3 times. Use USB thumb drives. FYI, This might take away, the withdraw servers are slow as of right now. Took 3 days for me.
If you have any questions ask. Also you can buy Dogecoin or Bitcoin on ebay, do that at your own risk.
submitted by malak33 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Decentralize the World: Seeding the Chain

Seeding the Chain
Some of us over at /worldcryptonetwork have been organizing a campaign to physically distribute the bitcoin blockchain around the globe. We would like your feedback and suggestions.
The first locations we are looking at are places where there is just enough bandwidth to support daily updates and where no full node is currently participating on the network. We've already been contacted by PissedofffromNepal who is willing to work with us and interest has been coming in from South America, Ghana and Thailand.
For this first iteration we're going to start small, some Linux live drives with full node capabilities and a Raspberry Pi running the full node. Let us hope we can snowball this into something that can eventually offer more.
We want your feedback and suggestions
So please comment below if you have anything that thing should be added to the suite or the videos and documents section.

V0.01

Please check out our World Crypto Network DAO masterthread if you're interested in participating in future projects as well.
submitted by pierebel0 to worldcryptonetwork [link] [comments]

Simplified version of installing Bitcoin Full Node on Raspberry Pi 3.

Hey. I'm a total Linux noob, but I decided to undertake an effort to run a full node on my Raspberry Pi. I followed this tutorial, but still found it was too detailed/complicated, so I reduced it down to the basic steps needed to make it happen. This tl;dr tutorial assumes that you are running Raspian, your RaspPi has internet connectivity, you have an external USB hard drive connected formatted as FAT32 and your Linux username is "pi". These instructions will install Bitcoin Core without wallet functionality.
Create a directory that will act as a mount point for the USB drive:
[email protected]~$ mkdir ~/bitcoinData 
With your USB drive connected, run this command to confirm that your drive is recognized as /dev/sd1:
[email protected]~$ sudo blkid 
In order to tell your Raspberry Pi to mount your USB drive automatically so that anything we put in the bitcoinData directory will be going onto the USB drive we need to edit the /etc/fstab file:
[email protected]~$ sudo nano /etc/fstab 
Add the following line to the fstab file. The following assumes that the drive was /dev/sd1:
/dev/sda1 /home/pi/bitcoinData vfat uid=pi,gid=pi,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0 0 
Save the fstab file and reboot. When re-started, navigate with the File Manager to /home/pi/bitcoinData and make sure the folder size corresponds to the approximate size of your external drive. This is important, otherwise, the blockchain will be saved to the micro SD card. Unless your card is 256GB, it won't fit.
Enlarge the swap file, by editing the dphys-swapfile:
[email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
Change "CONF_SWAPSIZE=100" to "CONF_SWAPSIZE=1000". Save the file, then exit. Now run:
[email protected]~$ sudo dphys-swapfile setup [email protected]~$ sudo dphys-swapfile swapon 
Update your Raspbian:
[email protected]~$ sudo apt-get update [email protected]~$ sudo apt-get upgrade -y 
Install some packages:
[email protected]~$ sudo apt-get install autoconf libevent-dev libtool libssl-dev libboost-all-dev libminiupnpc-dev -y [email protected]~$ sudo apt-get install qt4-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libqrencode-dev -y 
Make a directory and change to that directory:
[email protected]~$ mkdir ~/bin [email protected]~$ cd ~/bin 
Install Bitcoin:
[email protected]~/bin$ git clone -b 0.14 https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin.git [email protected]~/bin$ cd bitcoin/ [email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ ./autogen.sh [email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ ./configure --enable-upnp-default --disable-wallet [email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ make -j2 
It will take about 2 hours for the "make -j2" to finish. Once done, run:
[email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ sudo make install 
Now, create a bitcoin.conf file:
[email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ cd ~/bitcoinData [email protected]~/bitcoinData$ nano bitcoin.conf 
Let's run this bad boy:
[email protected]~$ bitcoin-qt 
On the first start, choose the blockchain data directory as "/home/pi/bitcoinData". Expect that it will take 2 to 3 weeks to fully sync the blockchain.
The step that includes "enable-upnp-default" is intended to open the necessary port (8333) in your router. Either way, you may want to consider port-forwarding port 8333 to your Pi.
If you want to show your support for Segwit and BIP148, add the following to the bitcoin.conf file located in /home/pi/bitcoinData: uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP148
Enjoy!
submitted by iftodaywasurlastday to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Simplified version of installing Bitcoin Full Node on Raspberry Pi 3.

Hey. I'm a total Linux noob, but I decided to undertake an effort to run a full node on my Raspberry Pi. I followed this tutorial, but still found it was too detailed/complicated, so I reduced it down to the basic steps needed to make it happen. This tl;dr tutorial assumes that you are running Raspian, your RaspPi has internet connectivity, you have an external USB hard drive connected formatted as FAT32 and your Linux username is "pi". These instructions will install Bitcoin Core without wallet functionality.
Create a directory that will act as a mount point for the USB drive:
[email protected]~$ mkdir ~/bitcoinData 
With your USB drive connected, run this command to confirm that your drive is recognized as /dev/sd1:
[email protected]~$ sudo blkid 
In order to tell your Raspberry Pi to mount your USB drive automatically so that anything we put in the bitcoinData directory will be going onto the USB drive we need to edit the /etc/fstab file:
[email protected]~$ sudo nano /etc/fstab 
Add the following line to the fstab file. The following assumes that the drive was /dev/sd1:
/dev/sda1 /home/pi/bitcoinData vfat uid=pi,gid=pi,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0 0 
Save the fstab file and reboot. When re-started, navigate with the File Manager to /home/pi/bitcoinData and make sure the folder size corresponds to the approximate size of your external drive. This is important, otherwise, the blockchain will be saved to the micro SD card. Unless your card is 256GB, it won't fit.
Enlarge the swap file, by editing the dphys-swapfile:
[email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
Change "CONF_SWAPSIZE=100" to "CONF_SWAPSIZE=1000". Save the file, then exit. Now run:
[email protected]~$ sudo dphys-swapfile setup [email protected]~$ sudo dphys-swapfile swapon 
Update your Raspbian:
[email protected]~$ sudo apt-get update [email protected]~$ sudo apt-get upgrade -y 
Install some packages:
[email protected]~$ sudo apt-get install autoconf libevent-dev libtool libssl-dev libboost-all-dev libminiupnpc-dev -y [email protected]~$ sudo apt-get install qt4-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libqrencode-dev -y 
Make a directory and change to that directory:
[email protected]~$ mkdir ~/bin [email protected]~$ cd ~/bin 
Install Bitcoin:
[email protected]~/bin$ git clone -b 0.14 https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin.git [email protected]~/bin$ cd bitcoin/ [email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ ./autogen.sh [email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ ./configure --enable-upnp-default --disable-wallet [email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ make -j2 
It will take about 2 hours for the "make -j2" to finish. Once done, run:
[email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ sudo make install 
Now, create a bitcoin.conf file:
[email protected]~/bin/bitcoin$ cd ~/bitcoinData [email protected]~/bitcoinData$ nano bitcoin.conf 
Let's run this bad boy:
[email protected]~$ bitcoin-qt 
On the first start, choose the blockchain data directory as "/home/pi/bitcoinData". Expect that it will take 2 to 3 weeks to fully sync the blockchain.
The step that includes "enable-upnp-default" is intended to open the necessary port (8333) in your router. Either way, you may want to consider port-forwarding port 8333 to your Pi.
If you want to show your support for Segwit and BIP148, add the following to the bitcoin.conf file located in /home/pi/bitcoinData: uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP148
Enjoy!
submitted by iftodaywasurlastday to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Core 0.14.2 released | Wladimir J. van der Laan | Jun 17 2017

Wladimir J. van der Laan on Jun 17 2017:
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA512
Bitcoin Core version 0.14.2 is now available from:
https://bitcoin.org/bin/bitcoin-core-0.14.2/
Or by torrent:
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:b4fc7820df95b8b39603ad246c241272ec403619&dn;=bitcoin-core-0.14.2&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.publicbt.com%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.ccc.de%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3A6969&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.leechers-paradise.org%3A6969&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80%2Fannounce
This is a new minor version release, including various bugfixes and
performance improvements, as well as updated translations.
Please report bugs using the issue tracker at github:
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues
To receive security and update notifications, please subscribe to:
https://bitcoincore.org/en/list/announcements/join/
Compatibility

Bitcoin Core is extensively tested on multiple operating systems using
the Linux kernel, macOS 10.8+, and Windows Vista and later.
Microsoft ended support for Windows XP on April 8th, 2014,
No attempt is made to prevent installing or running the software on Windows XP, you
can still do so at your own risk but be aware that there are known instabilities and issues.
Please do not report issues about Windows XP to the issue tracker.
Bitcoin Core should also work on most other Unix-like systems but is not
frequently tested on them.
Notable changes

miniupnp CVE-2017-8798
Bundled miniupnpc was updated to 2.0.20170509. This fixes an integer signedness error
(present in MiniUPnPc v1.4.20101221 through v2.0) that allows remote attackers
(within the LAN) to cause a denial of service or possibly have unspecified
other impact.
This only affects users that have explicitly enabled UPnP through the GUI
setting or through the -upnp option, as since the last UPnP vulnerability
(in Bitcoin Core 0.10.3) it has been disabled by default.
If you use this option, it is recommended to upgrade to this version as soon as
possible.
Known Bugs

Since 0.14.0 the approximate transaction fee shown in Bitcoin-Qt when using coin
control and smart fee estimation does not reflect any change in target from the
smart fee slider. It will only present an approximate fee calculated using the
default target. The fee calculated using the correct target is still applied to
the transaction and shown in the final send confirmation dialog.
0.14.2 Change log

Detailed release notes follow. This overview includes changes that affect
behavior, not code moves, refactors and string updates. For convenience in locating
the code changes and accompanying discussion, both the pull request and
git merge commit are mentioned.

RPC and other APIs

P2P protocol and network code

Build system

Miscellaneous

GUI

Wallet

Credits

Thanks to everyone who directly contributed to this release:
As well as everyone that helped translating on Transifex.
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original: https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2017-June/014597.html
submitted by dev_list_bot to bitcoin_devlist [link] [comments]

Decentralize the World: Seeding the Chain

Seeding the Chain
Some of us over at /worldcryptonetwork have been organizing a campaign to physically distribute the bitcoin blockchain around the globe. We would like your feedback and suggestions.
The first locations we are looking at are places where there is just enough bandwidth to support daily updates and where no full node is currently participating on the network. We've already been contacted by PissedofffromNepal who is willing to work with us and interest has been coming in from South America, Ghana and Thailand.
For this first iteration we're going to start small, some Linux live drives with full node capabilities and a Raspberry Pi running the full node. Let us hope we can snowball this into something that can eventually offer more.
We want your feedback and suggestions
So please comment below if you have anything that thing should be added to the suite or the videos and documents section.

V0.01

Please check out our World Crypto Network DAO masterthread if you're interested in participating in future projects as well.
submitted by pierebel0 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

PIVX REBRANDED WALLET UPDATE

The first ever PIVX rebranded v.2.1.4.0 wallet has been released. Compiled wallet binaries for various OS should be put up in the repo link below.
https://github.com/PIVX-Project/PIVX/releases/tag/v2.1.4.0
IMPORTANT WALLET UPGRADE STEPS
If you have an existing wallet, you MUST rename the following 2 items 'BEFORE' you start the new wallet as the foldefile naming has changed.
  1. Shut down the wallet gracefully either via CLI or via wallet GUI.
  2. For linux users, hidden directory ".darknet" needs to be renamed to ".pivx".
  3. For Windows users, similar will need to be done to your wallet.dat directory. (usually located in %APPDATA%)
  4. For everyone, "darknet.conf" needs to be renamed to "pivx.conf".
  5. Replace the wallet binaries with the updated v2.1.4.0 binaries.
  6. Start the wallet!
For Windows users: I personally recommend Windows wallet users to specify the wallet.dat directory via a shortcut method. Basically create a shortcut the qt executable and append the -datadir= and specify a folder you created.
e.g. C:\Coins\PIVX\pivx-qt.exe -datadir=C:\Coins\PIVX\blockchain
Then the wallet and chain/dat/conf files will all be within a single folder instead of it going to %APPDATA%. This trick works for pretty much every coin under the sun btw. (bitcoin, litecoin, whatever coin etc etc) P.S. If you have an existing wallet.dat & conf files, you'll need to move them to the new -datadir folder.
this post was originally made by JAKIMAN on Bitcointalk forums here : https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1262920.5560
submitted by cryptosi to pivx [link] [comments]

Installing software outside of the package manager

Hello all.
I've recently taken an interest in Bitcoins (/bitcoins), and so I've naturally decided to try them out using Bitcoin's own bitcoin-qt wallet software. Unfortunately, debian-qt only appears to be available in the sid (unstable) repositories and I'm running wheezy (stable), so I've had to download the binaries from bitcoin.org and work it out from there.
I've pretty much got everything working, but I'm not sure if there's a preferred standard way to do what I'm doing. I have done a fair bit of research, and it has lead me to believe that /opt or /uslocal is the best place to home user installed programs.
Pretty much, the steps I've taken so far are: 1. Download the tarball from bitcoin.org. 2. Verify it to make sure it's authentic and all that jazz. 3. Extract it (which leaves me with a directory called bitcoin-0.8.6-linux). 4. Find the 64 bit binaries in bitcoin-0.8.6-linux (which are located at bitcoin-0.8.6-linux/bin/64/) and copy them to /uslocal/bin.
That's what I've done as far as installation goes. I have, of course, set up a menu in the application menu for XFCE that leads to the bitcoin-qt executable that's in /uslocal/bin, but other than that, that's all. One issue that is remaining is that in the applications menu, the application for the bitcoin wallet has no icon. Now, I know how to implement icons, but I'm not sure where the standard place for housing icons/pngs is on debian/linux systems, so I haven't bothered yet.
So, my main question is: have I done this right? Is this the standard way to do things, as far as installing outside of the package manager goes?
All of the software I have previously installed has been through the package manager, so this is new territory to me. I'd love to hear your advice -- thank you for reading. :)
submitted by Mint_Apple_Pie to debian [link] [comments]

The next big thing - THE NEW INTERNET

FreeSpeechMe-SPECIFIC IMPROVEMENTS WE PLAN TO DO:
Hide nmcontrol/namecoind windows on Windows
GNU/Linux users don't see the terminal windows for backend software; Windows users shouldn't be bothered by them either.
Don't try to visit .bit websites when blockchain isn't downloaded
Right now, visiting a .bit website with an incomplete blockchain will use an older version of that name's data. Usually this results in a failure to load the page with no good explanation of what's wrong, but in certain rare cases it could also hypothetically result in security issues such as hijacking. A better version of FreeSpeechMe should refuse to use incomplete blockchains.
Facilitate non-Firefox usage
FreeSpeechMe uses a networking method, HTTP, which is specific to website traffic. Replacing it with a different method, SOCKS, would make it much more flexible, so you could use Dot-Bit for non-website Internet applications such as SSH. It should also be possible to route other web browsers such as Chromium through FreeSpeechMe. FreeSpeechMe should support being installed as a standalone application for users who don't use Firefox (although obviously Firefox will remain the main method of installation).
Improvements for anonymous browsing
Right now FreeSpeechMe supports routing its traffic through anonymization proxies such as Tor and I2P (if they are installed), but it is not compatible with TorBrowser, so while attackers generally can't see your location or IP address, they can deduce that different activities you do online may have come from the same person. FreeSpeechMe should be improved to function in TorBrowser, which would prevent linkage of different online activities.
Improvements for anonymous hosting
FreeSpeechMe supports Tor and I2P hidden services (if the user has Tor or I2P installed), but does not support Freenet, OnionCat, GarliCat, or other anonymous hosting networks. This should be improved.
Support for next-gen TLS specification
FreeSpeechMe is using a method of specifying certificates to prevent hijacking which is deprecated in the Dot-Bit specification. While this method remains very secure, the newer specification has more features, and FreeSpeechMe should implement it.
HTTPS enforcement
Websites which claim to support HTTPS in their domain record should automatically be loaded in HTTPS, even if the user accidentally forgets the "s", to prevent hijacking in such cases. (Note for geeks: this is like the HSTS specification, but works even for sites you haven't visited before.)
Intelligent Redirecting
Websites that want to support Dot-Bit should be able to do so without changing their server configuration, and instead have FreeSpeechMe make the server think the preexisting domain is being requested. The user would still see the Dot-Bit URL in Firefox, and unlike iframe-based methods, the URL displayed in Firefox would change accordingly as the user clicks links..
Fix HTTP protocol bugs
Unencrypted HTTP Dot-Bit websites occasionally have odd behavior in FreeSpeechMe (sometimes manifesting as links not working properly); this is most frequently seen in WordPress websites. While we strongly encourage the use of HTTPS (which isn't subject to these bugs), we still want to fix the bugs with HTTP websites.
Round-Robin Load Balancing
Some large websites use multiple server IP addresses for a single domain. FreeSpeechMe should be able to randomly choose one.
OTHER NAMECOIN SOFTWARE IMPROVEMENTS
Some of this is possibly out of the scope of this one Indiegogo campaign, depending on funds raised. But these are things we're very interested in helping implement:
Rebase on the latest Bitcoin code
Namecoin is based on an outdated version of Bitcoin (0.3.x). We should rebase on a current release. We inquired with a well-qualified and well-respected contractor (who developed Namecoin-Qt) about how much this rebase would cost; the estimate was around $17,000-$35,000 US. Spending that much on one project would be out of the realm of this first campaign. However, it may be possible to reduce this cost significantly by rebasing on a codebase other than Bitcoin, such as libcoin.
Improve scalability
Namecoin currently requires having the entire blockchain for good security. While the 1.6GB blockchain isn't a large concern right now, future scalability requires that clients be able to securely resolve names without possessing the blockchain. There is a proposal for this called SPV+UTXO.
Automatic renewal of names
Losing your names because you forgot to renew them is a problem.
Names should be able to be renewed automatically. Preferably without decrypting the wallet each time the name is renewed, and maybe without even needing your client to be open when it renews. Any solution must be trust-free.
Cold storage of Namecoin name keys
To update a Namecoin name, the keys must be decrypted on a computer with Internet access; this could be a security risk if malware is installed on that computer. To fix this, cold storage should be used, as is possible with Bitcoin.
This is in two parts: (1) port the Armory client to Namecoin (this allows transactions to be signed offline), and (2) allow a cold-storage name to be used as a revocation key for a hot-wallet name (this is called the "import" field).
Optimize Speed
Dot-Bit is already much faster than other top-level domains for both name lookup and name propagation. However, it can be made even faster.
We estimate that pre-cached name lookup time can be decreased by 2- to 5-fold in some cases, uncached name lookup time can be decreased significantly, name update propagation can be reduced from 40 minutes to under 1 minute, and blockchain sync time can be reduced significantly.
Android support
Namecoin software currently does not support Android; this situation should be improved.
Better blockchain anonymity
Like Bitcoin, Namecoin can keep the location and IP address of name owners anonymous (if used with Tor), but the various activities of name owners can be linked by an attacker. This should be improved, e.g. by implementing Zerocoin.
Better blockchain privacy
Some name owners may wish their records to not be publicly accessible; encryption would improve this situation.
Decentralized website single sign-on
Namecoin can be used to log into websites in a secure way without needing a password (protecting people from database leaks or cracked passwords without trusting a third party such as "all your data are belong to us" systems like Facebook); this is implemented as the NameID library by domob. Unfortunately, this library is not easy for non-programmers to integrate with existing websites. Plugins should be created for major website backends such as Drupal, phpBB, WordPress, and SMF, to allow trust-free NameID sign-on to be as easy as checking a box.
Automated builds
Namecoin software should support automated builds and testing so that our developers and testers can work more efficiently. The builds should also be deterministic (as Bitcoin and Tor are doing) to improve security.
Offline signing of static websites
Verifying signatures of static websites against the blockchain would prevent hijacking even if a web server is completely compromised.
SSH client integration
Log into your servers remotely without trusting your network or manually verifying fingerprints, using the same anti-hijacking features that FreeSpeechMe first implemented.
submitted by kitthecar to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Found 8 virus on chainstate

Hi: I m trying to use bitcoin in the safest way: I learned that the best thing I could do is running bitcoind and bitcoin-qt, as it is a full-node and outcoming transactions are safer because part of the process is done on my computer due to that huge folder (over 60 GB ) where blockchain is stored.
I choosed Linux as Operative System for bitcoind and bitcoin qt and well, the thing is that I found up to 8 virus on this location:
/home/use.bitcoin/chainstate/
like for instance:
/home/use.bitcoin/chainstate/427915.ldb: Gen 981 FOUND
well, CLAMAV reports 8 viruses on these .ldb files contained on /home/use.bitcoin/chainstate/
GEN 981, Violetta-B, Gergana-222, Gen 100 Years 1, Phantom, Italian 1, Copyright.2, Syslock.2 are the names
Tried to find out if some other users where afected or how this could be solved, the only thing I found is a similar problem related with sst files on Windows users and some other reports but no forum discussion.
Would like to ask someone who would know about it what should I do next?.
of course I can erase them with
sudo clamscan -r --remove/home
but ... will I mess something on bitcoind, bitcoin-qt ?
What could I do?. I don´t feel like safe using this due to CLAMAV, but little do I understand about virus or malware, apart from scanning. So I m making this post to let the community know about it and in hope I could find a solution and/or explanation.
Kind Regards.
submitted by jantaroa to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

4. Installing Bitcoin Core on Linux Installing Bitcoin-QT JSON RPC Calls with Bitcoin qt (4 of 6) Linux QT Wallet installation Featuring VERGE How to run Bitcoin Core 0.9.2.1 on external Hard Drive

Doing so directs Bitcoin Core to use, not the default data directory, but the one given as a parameter. Begin by right-clicking on the desktop and selecting New -> Shortcut. Browse to the location of the Bitcoin Core executable (C:\Program Files\Bitcoin\bitcoin-qt.exe) and click the OK button. Bitcoin software has both a graphical interface called bitcoin-qt and a console interface, bitcoind. If the first is convenient for human use, then without a text it is quite difficult to make an online store or any other service that accepts bitcoins as a payment. About it and speech will go. To work you need to run one instance of bitcoin as a daemon, so he worked as a full-fledged host on ... “sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt” Press ‘y’ and Press <Enter>, the installation should start. It will take a few seconds to install. Once it’s installed, click on “Show Applications” icon and you should see Bitcoin Core icon on the Applications list. Now click on Bitcoin Core to start it. You should be greeted with the following window. Its asking where it should save your wallet ... LXer: Getting Started in Bitcoin? Check Out These 5 Bitcoin Clients for Linux: LXer: Syndicated Linux News: 0: 12-16-2017 05:21 PM: Bitcoin-qt, Bitcoin Mining, and Tor in Slackware 14.1! deadstar32: Linux - Software: 1: 02-06-2016 01:04 PM: LXer: The Death of Windows XP Won’t Kill the ATM Industry, or Help Bitcoin: LXer: Syndicated Linux News ... How do I move my Bitcoin Core data file. Safely exit Bitcoin Core (bitcoin-qtbitcoind). Make a new secure backup copy of your wallet.dat.; Move you entire .bitcoin folder to the new location, except for bitcoin.conf which you must leave where it is in the existing .bitcoin folder. Edit bitcoin.conf to add datadir={full path to new .bitcoin folder}.; Start Bitcoin Core and check properly that ...

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4. Installing Bitcoin Core on Linux

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind Linux terminal new stuff: clear, ll, cd, touch, echo, cat, shutdown www.bitcoinhackers.org how to make applications with Bitcoins. For the Love of Physics - Walter Lewin - May 16, 2011 - Duration: 1:01:26. Lectures by Walter Lewin. Bitcoin-QT is a Bitcoin wallet and does some other functions. Running this software is the backbone to the entire Bitcoin system. You may need to open port 8333 in your firewall. For more info see 02:43 download Bitcoin Core 0.9.2.1 for Windows 64 bits: ... Introduction to Linux Operating System - Duration: 2:29:05. Guru99 Recommended for you. 2:29:05. How Bitcoin Actually Works (Computers ... How to run Bitcoin-qt as a server with a configuration file ... Linus Tech Tips Recommended for you. 14:44. HakTip - How to Capture Packets with Wireshark - Getting Started - Duration: 7:08. Hak5 ...

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